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A revision of the Lepidoptem of Tasmania

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Turner, A Jefferis (1925) A revision of the Lepidoptem of Tasmania. Papers and Proceedings of the Royal Society of Tasmania. pp. 118-151. ISSN 0080-4703

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Abstract

Tasmania is rich in Lepidoptera. The species are numerous, very interesting, but have been very little studied. There is a great want of resident collectors and observers and it is to encourage these that this revision has been planned. The classification adopted is that used in Dr. Tillyard's recent book. It is a revision of species only; no notice is taken of local races (usually, but unfortunately, called subspecies). To each genus and species is added the name of its author. Synonyms are excluded, and after each species there is given a single reference, not necessarily to the original description, but to the best available description for the local student. Where this description appears under another name, that name is added in brackets. Genera and species which have not been recorded outside Tasmania are distinguished by a -*. Tasmania was united to the mainland during the lifetime of existing species in Pleistocene times. A period of glaciation, which occurred during this connection, covered the mountains with snowfields, while the lower areas supported a fauna which has since then been restricted to alpine regions. In this way we explain the occurrence of a number of identical species in the widely separated areas of Cradle Mountain and the Australian Alps. Much of the old Tasmanian fauna, not able to withstand these rigorous conditions, must have been driven northwards, to return with the resumption of a milder climate, probably with some impoverishment, which was compensated by a large immigration of Australian forms. The whole fauna is now preponderatingly Australian, but a relatively small proportion of peculiarly Tasmanian forms still survive, mostly in the mountains.

Item Type: Article
Keywords: Royal Society of Tasmania, RST, Van Diemens Land, natural history, science, ecology, taxonomy, botany, zoology, geology, geography, papers & proceedings, Australia, UTAS Library, A.Jefferis Turner
Journal or Publication Title: Papers and Proceedings of the Royal Society of Tasmania
Page Range: pp. 118-151
ISSN: 0080-4703
Additional Information: Copyright Royal Society of Tasmania
Date Deposited: 01 May 2012 04:04
Last Modified: 18 Nov 2014 04:30
URI: http://eprints.utas.edu.au/id/eprint/13032
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