Library Open Repository

Recent increases in Tasmanian Huon pine ring widths from a subalpine stand: natural climate variabiliry, CO2 fertilisation, or greenhouse warming?

Downloads

Downloads per month over past year

Cook, ER and Francey, RJ and Buckley, BM and D'Arrigo, RD (1996) Recent increases in Tasmanian Huon pine ring widths from a subalpine stand: natural climate variabiliry, CO2 fertilisation, or greenhouse warming? Papers and Proceedings of the Royal Society of Tasmania, 130 (2). pp. 65-72. ISSN 0080-4703

[img]
Preview
PDF
1996-Cook-Huon_pine.pdf | Download (292kB)
Available under University of Tasmania Standard License.

Abstract

Tasmanian subalpine Huon pines from the extreme high-altitude limit of the species distribution provide a summer temperature reconstruction extending back beyond 800 Be. Compared to low elevation Huon pine sites, the subalpine ring-widths exhibit a straightforward direct response to current growth-season temperatures and indicate anomalous warming of 0.33 ± O.06°C from 1967- 91. This warming is consistent with Tasmanian instrumental records and with hemispheric and global records. The possibility that the trees are responding directly to CO2 fertilisation is explored, using a high-precision record of CO2 , obtained from air in Antarctic ice and firn, plus direct measurements of air from Cape Grim. The temperature forcing appears capable of explaining the ring-width variations in the alpine trees over the full range of observed periods, whereas CO2 fertilisation would require a more complex interaction and is not supported by other arguments. Two millennia-long tree-ring reconstructions of summer temperatures from South America do not exhibit the recent warming, nor other features found in the Tasmanian record on decadal to century time-scales. In fact, the South American chronologies bear little resemblance to each other, but do, however, reflect their own regional instrumental records. The Mt Read ring-width chronology, and the instrumental temperature series used for its calibration, also co-vary with climate influences of a distinctly regional character, yet still replicate many of the features reported as hemispheric and global temperatures over the last century. Spectral analysis of the Mt Read tree-ring data over the full 2792 years suggests that at least part of the recent warming in the instrumental records could be a consequence of "natural forcing" of the record, complicating an interpretation in terms of a greenhouse-forced warming.

Item Type: Article
Keywords: Royal Society of Tasmania, RST, Van Diemens Land, natural history, science, ecology, taxonomy, botany, zoology, geology, geography, papers & proceedings, Australia, UTAS Library
Journal or Publication Title: Papers and Proceedings of the Royal Society of Tasmania
Page Range: pp. 65-72
ISSN: 0080-4703
Additional Information: Copyright Royal Society of Tasmania
Date Deposited: 04 Jun 2012 00:47
Last Modified: 18 Nov 2014 04:38
URI: http://eprints.utas.edu.au/id/eprint/14433
Item Statistics: View statistics for this item

Repository Staff Only (login required)

Item Control Page Item Control Page