Library Open Repository

On the natural enemies of the salmon in Tasmania

Downloads

Downloads per month over past year

Allport, Morton (1864) On the natural enemies of the salmon in Tasmania. Monthly Notices of Papers & Proceedings of the Royal Society of Tasmania. pp. 62-65.

[img]
Preview
PDF
1864-allport-enemies-salmon.pdf | Download (375kB)
Available under University of Tasmania Standard License.

Abstract

Having so far succeeded in the great work of the introduction of the salmon to Australia, it now becomes necessary to consider what difficulties we may have to encounter from the presence of creatures in our Tasmanian waters, likely to prey upon the ova, the fry in their early stages, or the full grown fish. Many persons imagine that enemies will be more numerous here than in Great Britain ; I do not think so, and have endeavoured to make a list of our indigenous animals likely to prove injurious. And first as to those found in the fresh waters ;—pre-eminent amongst which stands the beast with a bill, the platypus ( Ornithorynchus anatinus). This sleek creature will prove the chief scourge to the natural spawning beds in our rivers, for he is not only well fitted by nature with rapid powers of locomotion in water, and to hold his own in strong ripples, but he can remain under water for several minutes at a time, and whilst there can burrow to the bottom of the deepest spawning rids and avail himself of the beautiful spoon with which he was furnished at his birth, for the very purpose, one would think, of scooping up ova.

Item Type: Article
Keywords: Royal Society of Tasmania, Van Diemens Land, VDL, Hobart Town, natural sciences, proceedings, records
Journal or Publication Title: Monthly Notices of Papers & Proceedings of the Royal Society of Tasmania
Page Range: pp. 62-65
Additional Information: In 1843 the Horticultural and Botanical Society of Van Diemen's Land was founded and became the Royal Society of Van Diemen's Land for Horticulture, Botany, and the Advancement of Science in 1844. In 1855 its name changed to Royal Society of Tasmania for Horticulture, Botany, and the Advancement of Science. In 1911 the name was shortened to Royal Society of Tasmania.
Date Deposited: 07 Sep 2012 06:36
Last Modified: 18 Nov 2014 04:42
URI: http://eprints.utas.edu.au/id/eprint/14931
Item Statistics: View statistics for this item

Repository Staff Only (login required)

Item Control Page Item Control Page