Library Open Repository

Notes on the relations of the yellow limestone (Travertin), of Geilston Bay, with other fluviatile and lacustrine deposits in Tasmania and Australia, together with descriptions of two new fossil Helices.

Downloads

Downloads per month over past year

Johnston, Robert Mackenzie (1879) Notes on the relations of the yellow limestone (Travertin), of Geilston Bay, with other fluviatile and lacustrine deposits in Tasmania and Australia, together with descriptions of two new fossil Helices. Papers & Proceedings and Report of the Royal Society of Tasmania. pp. 81-90.

[img]
Preview
PDF
johnston-yellow-limestone-1879.pdf | Download (738kB)
Available under University of Tasmania Standard License.

Abstract

The freshwater limestone in the neighbourhood of Geilston Bay, Hobart Town, is most interesting to geologists on account of the richness of its included organic remains. It attracted the attention of the illustrious Mr. Darwin during the visit of H.M.S. Beagle to Hobart Town, and was afterwards briefly alluded to by him in his "Journal of Researches." as " A solitary and superficial patch of yellowish limestone, or Travertin, which contains numerous impressions of leaves of trees, together with land shells not now existing. It is not improbable that this one small quarry includes the only remaining record of the vegetation of " A solitary and superficial patch of yellowish limestone, or Travertin, which contains numerous impressions of leaves of trees, together with land shells not now existing. It is not improbable that this one small quarry includes the only remaining record of the vegetation of Van Diemen's Land during one former epoch."

Item Type: Article
Keywords: Royal Society of Tasmania, Van Diemens Land, VDL, Hobart Town, natural sciences, proceedings, records
Journal or Publication Title: Papers & Proceedings and Report of the Royal Society of Tasmania
Page Range: pp. 81-90
Additional Information: In 1843 the Horticultural and Botanical Society of Van Diemen's Land was founded and became the Royal Society of Van Diemen's Land for Horticulture, Botany, and the Advancement of Science in 1844. In 1855 its name changed to Royal Society of Tasmania for Horticulture, Botany, and the Advancement of Science. In 1911 the name was shortened to Royal Society of Tasmania.
Date Deposited: 20 Nov 2012 01:47
Last Modified: 18 Nov 2014 04:44
URI: http://eprints.utas.edu.au/id/eprint/15438
Item Statistics: View statistics for this item

Repository Staff Only (login required)

Item Control Page Item Control Page