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Notes showing that the estuary of the Derwent was occupied by a fresh-water lake during the tertiary period

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Johnston, Robert Mackenzie (1881) Notes showing that the estuary of the Derwent was occupied by a fresh-water lake during the tertiary period. Papers & Proceedings and Report of the Royal Society of Tasmania. pp. 7-21.

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Abstract

Apart from the circumstance that the extensive tertiary fluviatile and lacustrine formations of Australia have been the principal sources from which we have derived our rich treasures of gold and tin in the free state, their study from a naturalist's point of view is also peculiarly interesting from the nearness of their deposition to our own time. Many present may have noticed along the shores of the Derwent, particularly in the neighbourhood of Sandy Bay, One Tree Point, and Cornelian Bay, a series of sandy and clayey beds sometimes of considerable thickness and extent. They frequently dip irregularly at various angles, and in various directions, as if they had been much disturbed subsequent to their deposition, but they are never found at an altitude of much more than 40 feet above the existing sea level.

Item Type: Article
Keywords: Royal Society of Tasmania, Van Diemens Land, VDL, Hobart Town, natural sciences, proceedings, records
Journal or Publication Title: Papers & Proceedings and Report of the Royal Society of Tasmania
Page Range: pp. 7-21
Additional Information: In 1843 the Horticultural and Botanical Society of Van Diemen's Land was founded and became the Royal Society of Van Diemen's Land for Horticulture, Botany, and the Advancement of Science in 1844. In 1855 its name changed to Royal Society of Tasmania for Horticulture, Botany, and the Advancement of Science. In 1911 the name was shortened to Royal Society of Tasmania.
Date Deposited: 26 Nov 2012 22:13
Last Modified: 18 Nov 2014 04:44
URI: http://eprints.utas.edu.au/id/eprint/15529
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