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References to Baron Constantin von Ettingshausen's recent observations on the Tertiary flora of Australia

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von Mueller, Ferdinand (1884) References to Baron Constantin von Ettingshausen's recent observations on the Tertiary flora of Australia. Papers & Proceedings of the Royal Society of Tasmania. pp. 203-207.

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Abstract

The 47th volume of the Imperial Academy of Science, Vienna, issued this year, contains an important essay on tertiary vegetable fossils of Australia, the results of original researches by Baron Von Ettingshausen, who has been engaged for fully 30 years in endeavours of systematising on the often enigmatic relics of vegetations of former geological periods. Baron Von Ettingshausen, on this present occasion, alludes extensively to leaf impressions obtained by Dr. R. McCormick (one of the surgeons of Sir James Boss' antarctic expeditions during the stay of the Erebus and Terror at Hobart) in the travertin of the country adjacent to the entrance of the Derwent; and this distinguished palaeontologist had likewise an opportunity, through the authorities of the British Museum, to examine the specimens of fossils collected in the same region by Mr. R. M. Johnston. Baron Von Ettingshausen has defined 33 species, which he assorts into 21 genera, pertaining to 16 natural orders.

Item Type: Article
Keywords: Royal Society of Tasmania, Van Diemens Land, VDL, Hobart Town, natural sciences, proceedings, records
Journal or Publication Title: Papers & Proceedings of the Royal Society of Tasmania
Page Range: pp. 203-207
Additional Information: In 1843 the Horticultural and Botanical Society of Van Diemen's Land was founded and became the Royal Society of Van Diemen's Land for Horticulture, Botany, and the Advancement of Science in 1844. In 1855 its name changed to Royal Society of Tasmania for Horticulture, Botany, and the Advancement of Science. In 1911 the name was shortened to Royal Society of Tasmania.
Date Deposited: 30 Nov 2012 03:47
Last Modified: 18 Nov 2014 04:45
URI: http://eprints.utas.edu.au/id/eprint/15610
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