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Remarks on the observed periodicity of the death-rate, with suggestions as to its possible relation with the periodicity of solar and other super-terrestrial phenomena

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Johnston, Robert Mackenzie (1884) Remarks on the observed periodicity of the death-rate, with suggestions as to its possible relation with the periodicity of solar and other super-terrestrial phenomena. Papers & Proceedings of the Royal Society of Tasmania. pp. 236-239.

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Abstract

The remarkable curves which determine the maxima and minima of sunspots, auroral and magnetic phenomena, earth-tremors, earthquakes, barometric, magnetic, and other secular disturbances, have again and again attracted the attention of many skilled observers; and while it is generally admitted that the limits of time and space within which records of such matters have been carefully tabulated are, as yet, too circumscribed to throw light upon many anomalies, it is almost conclusive that the movements of the larger of the planets, notably Jupiter, exercise a very powerful influence mediately or immediately upon the several matters referred to. It is also noteworthy that the mean death-rate of the Colonies of Australia, for the last twenty years, is lower than the mean death-rate of Europe by about 10 per 1,000 persons living, and that owing to the absence of a dense population the former is comparatively unaffected by those artificial evils attendant upon crowded centres of population. Includes comparative table showing the suggested coincidence between the death-rate and certain super-terrestrial phenomena.

Item Type: Article
Keywords: Royal Society of Tasmania, Van Diemens Land, VDL, Hobart Town, natural sciences, proceedings, records
Journal or Publication Title: Papers & Proceedings of the Royal Society of Tasmania
Page Range: pp. 236-239
Additional Information: In 1843 the Horticultural and Botanical Society of Van Diemen's Land was founded and became the Royal Society of Van Diemen's Land for Horticulture, Botany, and the Advancement of Science in 1844. In 1855 its name changed to Royal Society of Tasmania for Horticulture, Botany, and the Advancement of Science. In 1911 the name was shortened to Royal Society of Tasmania.
Date Deposited: 05 Dec 2012 01:27
Last Modified: 18 Nov 2014 04:45
URI: http://eprints.utas.edu.au/id/eprint/15623
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