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Description of a new species of fossil Loricella (order Polyplacophora). With remarks on some undescribed characters present in Loricella angasi, Ad. and Ang., and L.torri, Ashby

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Ashby, Edwin (1921) Description of a new species of fossil Loricella (order Polyplacophora). With remarks on some undescribed characters present in Loricella angasi, Ad. and Ang., and L.torri, Ashby. Papers & Proceedings of the Royal Society of Tasmania. pp. 37-40.

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Abstract

Mr. E. D. Atkinson, early in September last, sent me a very beautiful valve of a Chiton which
he had obtained at Table Cape, a locality that has yielded
to him and his son many fine forms of fossil mollusca. Three
species of Loricella from the same locality, and the result
of the joint work of the two, were described by Mr. A. F.
Basset Hull (in Proc. Lin. Soc. of New South Wales, 1914,
Vol. XXXIX., Pt. 4). Since receiving the specimen herein
described from Mr. Atkinson, he has passed away. He was
an assiduous collector, and many fine forms have been discovered
as a result of his earnest labours, and we all owe
a debt to his memory.
Mr. Hull, in the paper before mentioned, comments on
the large number of species belonging to the genera Loricella
and Lorica represented in the Table Cape deposits, and
the apparent dwindling of species in recent times. He states
that the genus Loricella "is represented by a single living
"species," and, speaking of the genus Lorica, which also is
well represented in the same beds, he says "one only Lorica
volvox, Reeve, is still extant."
Since Mr. Hull wrote thus, three living forms of this
latter genus have been recognised, two of which are Australian,
and one from New Zealand, also a second species
of Loricella has been described by the writer, who, in addition,
foreshadows the probability of yet another species being
recognised. While it is evident that these southern seas
were exceptionally rich in species belonging to these two
genera at the time the Table Cape Beds were laid down,
recent research indicates that both genera are better represented
by living forms than was thought to be the case
when Mr. Hull's paper was written.

Item Type: Article
Keywords: Royal Society of Tasmania, Van Diemens Land, VDL, Hobart Town, natural sciences, proceedings, records
Journal or Publication Title: Papers & Proceedings of the Royal Society of Tasmania
Page Range: pp. 37-40
Collections: Royal Society Collection > Papers & Proceedings of the Royal Society of Tasmania
Additional Information:

In 1843 the Horticultural and Botanical Society of Van Diemen's Land was founded and became the Royal Society of Van Diemen's Land for Horticulture, Botany, and the Advancement of Science in 1844. In 1855 its name changed to Royal Society of Tasmania for Horticulture, Botany, and the Advancement of Science. In 1911 the name was shortened to Royal Society of Tasmania.

Date Deposited: 10 Dec 2012 04:26
Last Modified: 18 Nov 2014 04:46
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