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Tourism and bushwalking in the Cradle Mountain-Lake St Clair National Park context, characteristics and impacts

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Byers, MC (1996) Tourism and bushwalking in the Cradle Mountain-Lake St Clair National Park context, characteristics and impacts. Coursework Master thesis, University of Tasmania.

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Abstract

The Cradle Mountain-Lake St Clair National Park has a unique natural
environment, characterised by a varied geology, a heavily glaciated
landscape, a cool wet alpine climate with considerable seasonal variation, a
complex mosaic of plant communities including many endemic Tasmanian
species, and high-quality wilderness values. The area now reserved in the
Park has been subject to a variety of land uses, nearly all concerned with
resource extraction or utilisation. The Park has considerable cultural
heritage values, including numerous remnants of these previous uses.
The Cradle Mountain-Lake St Clair National Park is an important
destination for tourists and bushwalkers alike. This study aims to examine
tourism and bushwalking in the Park. This involves the investigation of
the nature of these uses, the supply of tourism infrastructure, the numbers
and characteristics of users, and the impacts resulting from these uses.
Research work included personal observation, the collection of background
information, the analysis of Parks and Wildlife Service statistics, water
quality sampling. the undertaking of a questionnaire survey of Overland
Track walkers, and a survey of the condition of the Overland and Pine
Valley tracks. The study finds that both tourism and bushwalking have increased
considerably in recent years. Upgrading of the tracks and other tourist
infrastructure has made the Park more accessible and attracted new types of
visitor. While these increasing levels of visitation have resulted in a range
of benefits, they have also resulted in many negative impacts, mainly on the
natural environment. Tourism, bush walking, and their resulting impacts
require active management by the Parks and Wildlife Service. Several
recommendations are made as to how this management can be improved.

Item Type: Thesis (Coursework Master)
Additional Information:

Copyright the Author.
Permission must be sought from the author before any commercial use of the research. The author can be contacted at the following address: mike.byers0@gmail.com

Date Deposited: 17 Dec 2012 22:45
Last Modified: 15 Sep 2017 01:06
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