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Studies in Tasmanian mammals, living and extinct. Number I. Nototherium mitchelli (a marsupial rhinoceros).

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Scott, Herbert Hedley and Lord, Clive Errol (1920) Studies in Tasmanian mammals, living and extinct. Number I. Nototherium mitchelli (a marsupial rhinoceros). Papers & Proceedings of the Royal Society of Tasmania. pp. 13-15.

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Abstract

The discovery at Smithton, during the present year,
of a nearly complete skeleton of Nototherium mitchelli
forms the occasion for a revision of many of our ideas
respecting these remarkable marsupial animals, since the fragmentary
remains hitherto available for study have
failed to yield the sequence of evidence we now possess. This is a note only – intended
to place upon record the
fact Nototherium mitchelli was an extinct marsupial
rhinoceros, and that the four genera, Nototherium, Zygomaturus,
Enowenia, and Sthenomerus, with their -
species, are accordingly under revision.

Item Type: Article
Keywords: Royal Society of Tasmania, Van Diemens Land, VDL, Hobart Town, natural sciences, proceedings, records
Journal or Publication Title: Papers & Proceedings of the Royal Society of Tasmania
Page Range: pp. 13-15
Collections: Royal Society Collection > Papers & Proceedings of the Royal Society of Tasmania
Additional Information:

In 1843 the Horticultural and Botanical Society of Van Diemen's Land was founded and became the Royal Society of Van Diemen's Land for Horticulture, Botany, and the Advancement of Science in 1844. In 1855 its name changed to Royal Society of Tasmania for Horticulture, Botany, and the Advancement of Science. In 1911 the name was shortened to Royal Society of Tasmania.

Date Deposited: 13 Dec 2012 03:29
Last Modified: 15 Sep 2017 00:59
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