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Notes on the Mount Lyell District

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Power, Frederick Danvers (1891) Notes on the Mount Lyell District. Papers & Proceedings of the Royal Society of Tasmania. pp. 25-43.

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Abstract

On taking a casual glance at the geologically coloured map
of Tasmania we are struck with its similarity in appearance to
some huge concretion, for we see a nucleus of greenstone,
which is surrounded more or less by a ring of the upper coal
measures, and these again by rocks from other epochs.
If instead of the geological map we take a topographical
one we will observe the same onion -like structure. In the
centre we find the Lake Plateau country, from which the
river systems of Tasmania radiate. Encircling this are
various ranges of mountains, and finally we have the sea
coast, which has practically the same contour as the kernel,
making due allowance for irregularities, which would be
exaggerated by enlargements. Looking at the island as a
whole, it is heart-shaped, and somewhat similar in outline to
the continents, inasmuch as it is widest at the northern and
narrowest at its southern end, its length being north and
south. The geological and topographical features coinciding
so closely, we are naturally led to the conclusion that they
must in some way or other be intimately related. If we can
further connect our ore deposits with the physical developments
of the country we may gain something by our studies
with which the strictest utilitarian cannot find fault.

Item Type: Article
Keywords: Royal Society of Tasmania, Van Diemens Land, VDL, Hobart Town, natural sciences, proceedings, records
Journal or Publication Title: Papers & Proceedings of the Royal Society of Tasmania
Page Range: pp. 25-43
Collections: Royal Society Collection > Papers & Proceedings of the Royal Society of Tasmania
Additional Information:

In 1843 the Horticultural and Botanical Society of Van Diemen's Land was founded and became the Royal Society of Van Diemen's Land for Horticulture, Botany, and the Advancement of Science in 1844. In 1855 its name changed to Royal Society of Tasmania for Horticulture, Botany, and the Advancement of Science. In 1911 the name was shortened to Royal Society of Tasmania.

Date Deposited: 24 Jan 2013 01:29
Last Modified: 24 Aug 2017 02:14
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