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On a new Cordiceps

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Rodway, Leonard (1898) On a new Cordiceps. Papers & Proceedings of the Royal Society of Tasmania. pp. 100-102.

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Abstract

The genus Cordyceps comprises a well circumscribed
group of Sphaeriaceous Fungi, all very similar in habit>
structure, and fructification.
Their habit is to commence life within the bodies of
insects ; usually when these are in the larval stage. Here
the ordinary vegetative growth proceeds, namely, development
of hypbal tissue. This soon disturbs the comfort and
health of the host, who, in most instances, then seeks
seclusion and dies. The fungus continues to grow, and
absorbs all but the hard chitinous parts. When food runs
short, fructification commences. Includes illustration.

Item Type: Article
Keywords: Royal Society of Tasmania, Van Diemens Land, VDL, Hobart Town, natural sciences, proceedings, records
Journal or Publication Title: Papers & Proceedings of the Royal Society of Tasmania
Page Range: pp. 100-102
Collections: Royal Society Collection > Papers & Proceedings of the Royal Society of Tasmania
Additional Information:

In 1843 the Horticultural and Botanical Society of Van Diemen's Land was founded and became the Royal Society of Van Diemen's Land for Horticulture, Botany, and the Advancement of Science in 1844. In 1855 its name changed to Royal Society of Tasmania for Horticulture, Botany, and the Advancement of Science. In 1911 the name was shortened to Royal Society of Tasmania.

Date Deposited: 14 Mar 2013 03:12
Last Modified: 18 Nov 2014 04:49
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