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Preliminary note on the rocks used in the manufacture of the tronattas.

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Noetling, Fritz (1909) Preliminary note on the rocks used in the manufacture of the tronattas. Papers and Proceedings of the Royal Society of Tasmania. pp. 85-102. ISSN 0080-4703

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Abstract

The observations here recorded are based on the
examination of more than 5,000 specimens, all collected
by myself chiefly in the southern and central parts of
Tasmania.
If the metamorphic theory is correct, it stands to
reason that there must be a considerable number of
varieties of cherty rocks. A metamorphosed sandstone
must be considerably different from a rock whose origin
is a shale. But not only are the primary rocks widely
different in chemical composition, but each kind,
whether sandstone, shale, or anything else, varies considerably.
Whenever a collection of native stone implements is
made in the island, and such collection be sorted afterwards,
it will be found that two large groups can be
distinguished at once: Volcanic rocks and Metamorphosed sedimentary rock of a highly siliceous nature.
The above investigation has conclusively proved that
there is a great variety of rocks used in the manufacture
of the tronatta. This variety of substances stands in a
sharp contrast to the monotony of the material used in
the manufacture of the European implements.
Variety of material and
monotony of the same are the chief distinguishing
feature of an otherwise undistinguisiiable collection of
eolithes and archaeolithes from Tasmanian and Europe.

Item Type: Article
Keywords: Royal Society of Tasmania, Van Diemens Land, VDL, Hobart Town, natural sciences, proceedings, records
Journal or Publication Title: Papers and Proceedings of the Royal Society of Tasmania
Page Range: pp. 85-102
ISSN: 0080-4703
Collections: Royal Society Collection > Papers & Proceedings of the Royal Society of Tasmania
Additional Information:

In 1843 the Horticultural and Botanical Society of Van Diemen's Land was founded and became the Royal Society of Van Diemen's Land for Horticulture, Botany, and the Advancement of Science in 1844. In 1855 its name changed to Royal Society of Tasmania for Horticulture, Botany, and the Advancement of Science. In 1911 the name was shortened to Royal Society of Tasmania.

Date Deposited: 13 May 2013 01:15
Last Modified: 15 Sep 2017 01:07
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