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Wood-inhabiting macrofungal assemblages in 43-year-old regenerating wet Eucalyptus Obliqua L'Her.Forest

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Gates, GM and Carpenter, D and Ratkowsky, DA and Dalton, PJ (2011) Wood-inhabiting macrofungal assemblages in 43-year-old regenerating wet Eucalyptus Obliqua L'Her.Forest. Papers and Proceedings of the Royal Society of Tasmania, 145. pp. 65-76. ISSN 0080-4703

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Abstract

This study focuses on the diversity and ecology of wood-inhabiting macrofungal species assemblages in a regenerating tall, wet, native Eucalyptus obliqua forest in southeast Tasmania, 43 years after natural and anthropogenic disturbances. Two plots subjected to "clearfell, burn and sow" silviculture were compared with two other nearby plots that had experienced wildfire. A total of 90 species was identified from 619 macro fungal records during six fortnightly visits between May and July 2010. The plots with abundant live Pomaderris ape tala trees in the understorey (i.e., those at Edwards Rd) had markedly different macrofungal assemblages from those with no or with sparse
Pomaderris apetala (i.e., at Hartz Rd). This study provided evidence that a 43-year-old regenerating forest maintains a core of common wood-inhabiting macrofungal species irrespective of type of disturbance. Furthermore, species most frequently observed in older forests in Tasmania can also occur in younger managed forests if biological legacies such as large diameter wood, well-decayed wood, large living
trees and a diversity of tree species remain after silvicultural treatment.

Item Type: Article
Keywords: Royal Society of Tasmania, RST, Van Diemans Land, natural history, science, ecology, wood-inhabiting macrofungi, Eucalyptus obliqua, Pomaderris apetala, wildfire, managed forests, Tasmania.
Journal or Publication Title: Papers and Proceedings of the Royal Society of Tasmania
Page Range: pp. 65-76
ISSN: 0080-4703
Collections: Royal Society Collection > Papers & Proceedings of the Royal Society of Tasmania
Additional Information:

Copyright Royal Society of Tasmania

Date Deposited: 20 Dec 2013 01:07
Last Modified: 15 Sep 2017 00:39
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