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Middle powers in the modern state system : a case study of Australia's role as a regional actor

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Chia, Keng Wei Edmund (2000) Middle powers in the modern state system : a case study of Australia's role as a regional actor. PhD thesis, University of Tasmania.

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Abstract

Foreign policy represents the effort of a state to defend its interests in
international relations, and power encapsulates the various factors that
measure the limits of a state's capacity in the promotion of its national
interests. This thesis examines the various factors, under the rubric of
power, which has guided the foreign policy of a middle power, Australia.
It argues that middle powers occupy a special niche within the context of
regional subsets of the general state system. It demonstrates that a middle
power, like Australia, is attracted to the use of multilateral institutional
arrangements, as a vehicle for influence in foreign policy, to defend
general interests within its geographic region. Four geographic regions,
the South West Pacific, the Antarctic region, the South East Asian region
and the Indian Ocean region, are surveyed. This thesis finds that
multilateral institutional arrangements have become the primary agency
of Australia's regional influence as a middle power but concludes that the
utility of regional arrangements varies with the geographic context in
which a middle power is situated.

Item Type: Thesis (PhD)
Copyright Holders: The Author
Copyright Information:

Copyright 2000 the Author - The University is continuing to endeavour to trace the copyright
owner(s) and in the meantime this item has been reproduced here in good faith. We
would be pleased to hear from the copyright owner(s).

Additional Information:

Thesis (Ph.D.)--University of Tasmania, 2000. Includes bibliographical references

Date Deposited: 25 Nov 2014 00:49
Last Modified: 06 Jul 2016 00:09
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