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Vietnamese migrants' attitudes towards Vietnamese sexist language

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Chau, MN (2006) Vietnamese migrants' attitudes towards Vietnamese sexist language. PhD thesis, University of Tasmania.

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Abstract

This thesis examines Vietnamese Australians' attitudes towards sexist language. One
can not separate language from the cultural and social issues as they are intertwined
with one another. The shaping of an individual's behaviours, attitudes, life values,
his/her application of language largely depends on the social environment where s/he
has grown up. In Vietnamese society, Confucianism has played a part in shaping
many individuals' thinking. Although in the present time it is not as popular as many
years ago, it still exists in a number of families, it can be seen through the way they
behave, what they believe. There are many research studies on the sexist language in
English whereas it is rare to find a research study dealing with sexist language in
Vietnamese. This thesis deals with the Vietnamese migrants' attitudes and perception
of sexist language. It investigates the nature and characteristics of sexist language in
Vietnamese and makes some comparison with that in English. Special attention is
given to the socio-cultural context in which sexist language was derived and used.
Both qualitative and quantitative research methods were used.

Item Type: Thesis (PhD)
Keywords: Sexism in language, Immigrants
Copyright Holders: The Author
Copyright Information:

Copyright 2006 the Author - The University is continuing to endeavour to trace the copyright
owner(s) and in the meantime this item has been reproduced here in good faith. We
would be pleased to hear from the copyright owner(s).

Additional Information:

Available for library use only and copying in accordance with the Copyright Act 1968, as amended. Thesis (PhD)--University of Tasmania, 2006. Includes bibliographical references

Date Deposited: 25 Nov 2014 00:55
Last Modified: 29 Apr 2016 00:28
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