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Geology of the Gondwana systems with special reference to India and Australia and with a view to test if the known facts make a reasonable palaeogeographic synthesis when applied to Carey's reconstruction of Gondwanaland

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Ahmad, Fakhruddin (1955) Geology of the Gondwana systems with special reference to India and Australia and with a view to test if the known facts make a reasonable palaeogeographic synthesis when applied to Carey's reconstruction of Gondwanaland. Unspecified thesis, University of Tasmania.

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Abstract

About a hundred years ago two brothers, W.T. and H.F.
Blanford, working in the sub-tropical parts of India declared that
the conglomerate they had examined in Talcher was of glacial origin
and consequently there was land Ice in the tropical part of
India in the late Palaeozoic times. Their observation and reasoning
becomes more remarkable when it is realised that they did not
find any striated or facetted boulders to back their argument.
Ridiculed by their colleagues, and laughed at by geologists,
physicists, astronomers, meteorologists, and other naturalists
abroad, they had to wait for about two decades before the discovery
of a striated pavement decided the issue in their favour.
Medlicott in a manuscript report in 1872 suggested the name
Gondwana after the ancient Kingdom of the Gondso an aboriginal
tribe which still populates the area, for the formation, and
Feistmantel brought it into print in 1876.
Discoveries of similar formations in Australia, S.
America, and S. Africa followed in quick succession, and land
connections were envisaged to explain the occurrence of identical
flora. It was Suess, who in 1885, introduced the term Gondwanaland
for the hypothetical continent which comprised all these
continents and the "land-bridges", that connected them.

Item Type: Thesis (Unspecified)
Copyright Holders: The Author
Copyright Information:

Copyright 1955 the Author - The University is continuing to endeavour to trace the copyright
owner(s) and in the meantime this item has been reproduced here in good faith. We
would be pleased to hear from the copyright owner(s).

Additional Information:

Thesis (M.Sc.) - Univerisity of Tasmania, 1955

Date Deposited: 25 Nov 2014 00:59
Last Modified: 07 Jun 2016 05:33
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