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The intertidal ecology of Tasmania.

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Guiler, E. R.(Eric Rowland),1922- (1953) The intertidal ecology of Tasmania. PhD thesis, University of Tasmania.

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Abstract

This thesis represents the results of five years' work on various aspects of the intertidal ecology of Tasmania. Most of the study of the features of our intertidal region has been carried out in South Tasmania but visits have been made to the East, West and North Coasts of the island.
The study is not yet complete as a work of this nature will take many years. It is considered, however, that the present stage of the investigation as presented in this thesis, is sufficgntay advanced to make it worth recording.
For convenience in presentation, the thesis has been divided into a series of parts which are all inter-related. There is a certain inevitable overlap of the material contained in the various parts but the discussions at the end of the parts is brief to avoid repetition in Parts 11, 12 and 15.
The major ecological problem in Tasmania is taxonomic. This is not discussed in the text but a few words here may suffice to illustrate the difficulties. There are only three check lists of invertebrate animals available to workers in Tasannia. One of these deals with the Molluscs (MEW, 1921 aid 1923) and the other two have been prepared as supplements to this investigation. The two groups listed are the Porifera and the Crustacea, and it has been found necessary to revise a list of the algae. Besides the lack of complete lists, much of the fauna has never been described and until such time as experts have worked on the various groups, it is impossible to proceed to community aid population studies. For this reason the work has been largely confined to the major features of various ecological habitats rather than to detailed population stulles.
Some of this 'work has been published and other parts are in press. The publishod material has appeared in Papers of the Royal Society of Tasmania, 1949, 1950 and 1951. Certain other features have been mentioned in lectures delivered before the Royal Society of Tasmania (5th July, 1949), the Tasmanian Field Naturalists Club (15th March, 1951) and the Australian and New Zealand Association for the Advancement of Science (25th May, 1951).
Throughout the thesis certain words such as association and allied terms have been avoided because it is not possible to decide the biotic relationships within a given group of animal species. The term dominant is used to refer to the Epecies which gives a characteristic appearance to the shore.
The authors of species are only shown once or twice throughout the thesis.

Item Type: Thesis (PhD)
Keywords: Marine animals, Ecology
Copyright Holders: The Author
Copyright Information:

Copyright 1953 the Author - The University is continuing to endeavour to trace the copyright
owner(s) and in the meantime this item has been reproduced here in good faith. We
would be pleased to hear from the copyright owner(s).

Additional Information:

Thesis (Ph.D.)--University of Tasmania, 1954

Date Deposited: 09 Dec 2014 01:11
Last Modified: 27 Oct 2016 03:45
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