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Total quality management and Deming's 14 points : implications for primary schools

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Laing, JF (2000) Total quality management and Deming's 14 points : implications for primary schools. Research Master thesis, University of Tasmania.

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Abstract

Over the last several years, schools in Western countries have been coming under increasing pressure to improve their performance in relation to student learning outcomes and fiscal responsibility. These years have coincided with the decentralisation of management and leadership practices in these countries, ostensibly to improve decision making at the local level, but more specifically, to reduce spending in the schools sector. Influenced by these trends, schools turned to business to identify successful management theories that could be adapted to the school setting.

This study explored the nature of J Edwards Deming's Total Quality Management for business as a theoretical construct in relation to its applicability to the primary school setting. More specifically, Deming's Fourteen Points were rewritten for the school context, taking into account the latest research. The result was the development of the Schools and Total Quality Management (SATQM) questionnaire, which was administered to 148 teachers, senior staff and principals in 18 Tasmanian government primary schools.

The results of the data analysis indicated that the SATQM instrument had validity, and that TQM was an appropriate managerial underpinning for primary schools. However, it appeared that some of Deming's Fourteen Points enjoyed higher levels of agreement amongst respondents than others.

Item Type: Thesis (Research Master)
Keywords: Total quality management in education
Copyright Information:

Copyright 2000 the author - The University is continuing to endeavour to trace the copyright owner(s) and in the meantime this item has been reproduced here in good faith. We would be pleased to hear from the copyright owner(s).

Additional Information:

Thesis (MEd)--University of Tasmania, 2000. Includes bibliographical references

Date Deposited: 19 Dec 2014 02:40
Last Modified: 12 Jul 2017 23:44
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