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The development of Tasmanian shore platforms

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Sanders, NK (1968) The development of Tasmanian shore platforms. PhD thesis, University of Tasmania.

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Abstract

Horizontal shore platforms at the approximate level of
high tide have been recognized as features of the world's
coastlines for over 100 years. Since the mid _19th Century,
geologists and geomorphologists have described these platforms
and attempted to account for their origins. Interest has
continued in shore platforms for two reasons: platforms are
notable in themselves as coastal features and they have been
used to indicate past sea levels.
The great deal of disagreement in the literature over the
processes of formation indicates the lack of actual knowledge
about developmental details. Recent studies have concentrated
on determining the details of platform formation, but many
processes still need clarification. Until these details are
known, there is little point in citing characteristic elevations
of horizontal, high tidal shore platforms as evidence of sea
level change.
Earlier workers tended to neglect three major avenues of
investigation which are important in defining the processes
involved in shore platform development, The three approaches
are precise mapping of the platform surfaces, laboratory work including wave tank experiments, and underwater study. In
addition, the influence of biological factors, climate, wave
characteristics and tidal regime were often overlooked. This
thesis is an attempt to explain the development of Tasmanian
shore platforms using precise measurement, experimentation and
underwater investigation, combined with recognition of the
influence of organic and environmental considerations. Information
gained will be combined with knowledge set forth by previous
workers to determine the factors involved in Tasmanian
shore platform development,
Although the present study is primarily concerned with the
development of horizontal, high tidal platforms, all the basic
Tasmanian platform types are considered, Determination of prooesaea
is faci:itated by analysis of the factors leading to the
production of platforms with differing slopes, surface roughness
and altitudinal locations.

The study is divided into three main parts. Section I
follows the development of ideas pertaining to shore platforms
from 1849 to the present, Section II describes a number of
significant Tasmanian shore platforms in detail as a foundation
for Section III. The final section combines previous theories
with information gained from field study and experiments to
isolate the factors important in the development of Tasmanian
shore platforms. Chapter 17, describing the fonnation of the
Tessellated Pavement, presents an example of how the factors
discussed in Section III interact in producing an actual platform.
Following Section III are two appendices: "Construction of a
Simple, Portable Tide Gauge" and "Stereo Photography from Light
Aircraft".

Item Type: Thesis (PhD)
Keywords: Coast changes
Copyright Holders: The Author
Copyright Information:

Copyright 1968 the Author - The University is continuing to endeavour to trace the copyright owner(s) and in the meantime this item has been reproduced here in good faith. We would be pleased to hear from the copyright owner(s).

Additional Information:

Thesis (Ph.D.) - University of Tasmania, 1968. Includes bibliographies

Date Deposited: 03 Feb 2015 03:19
Last Modified: 11 Mar 2016 05:56
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