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Microsatellite and morphological analysis of Eucalyptus globulus populations

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Jones, RC and Steane, DA and Potts, BM and Vaillancourt, RE (2002) Microsatellite and morphological analysis of Eucalyptus globulus populations. Canadian Journal of Forest Research, 32 (1). pp. 59-66.

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Abstract

Eucalyptus globulus Labill. is native to southeastern Australia and is the most important temperate hardwood plantation species in the world. It consists of four subspecies that are morphologically and geographically distinct but that are linked by morphologically and geographically intermediate populations. The Jeeralang provenance, an intermediate population from southeastern Victoria, is an important source of seed for plantations and genetic material for breeding programs because of its superior growth and wood density. To determine the genetic affinities of this provenance, 154 trees from three subspecies and the Jeeralang provenance were sampled. Analysis of 12 morphological characters verified that the Jeeralang provenance is intermediate between subspecies bicostata (Maiden, Blakely, & J. Simm.) Kirkpatr., globulus and pseudoglobulus (Naudin ex Maiden) Kirkpatr., with individuals having closest affinities to either ssp. globulus or ssp. bicostata. However, eight microsatellite loci showed that the Jeeralang provenance has greater affinities to Victorian ssp. globulus to which it is geographically closest. In contrast, Tasmanian and Victorian ssp. globulus are morphologically similar yet appear to be distinct at the molecular level. This study emphasizes the importance of using traits that are unlikely to be influenced by selection when determining the origin and affinities of populations.

Item Type: Article
Journal or Publication Title: Canadian Journal of Forest Research
Page Range: pp. 59-66
Identification Number - DOI: 10.1139/x01-172
Additional Information: BM Potts. Copyright 2002, National Research Council. Please refer to the journal link for access to the definitive, published version. Under the Canadian Copyright Act, individuals may download or print single copies of articles for personal research or study. Any person may reproduce short excerpts from articles in the journals for any purpose that respects the moral rights of authors, provided that the source is fully acknowledged. As a courtesy, the consent of authors of such material should be obtained directly from the author.
Date Deposited: 14 Feb 2008 01:25
Last Modified: 18 Nov 2014 03:29
URI: http://eprints.utas.edu.au/id/eprint/3191
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