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Cephalopod hatchling growth: the effects of initial size and seasonal temperatures

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Leporati, S and Pecl, GT and Semmens, JM (2000) Cephalopod hatchling growth: the effects of initial size and seasonal temperatures. Marine Biology, 151 (4). 1375- 1383. ISSN 0025-3162

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Abstract

Temperature is known to have a strong
influence on cephalopod growth during the early
exponential growth phase. Most captive growth studies
have used constant temperature regimes and assumed
that populations are composed of identically sized
individuals at hatching, overlooking the effects of
seasonal temperature variation and individual hatchling
size heterogeneity. This study investigated the
relative roles of initial hatchling size and simulated
natural seasonal temperature regimes on the growth of
64 captive Octopus pallidus over a 4-month period.
Initial weights were recorded, and daily food consumption
and fortnightly growth monitored. Two
temperature treatments were applied replicating local
seasonal water temperatures: spring/summer (14–18C)
and summer/autumn (18–14C). Overall octopuses in
the spring/summer treatment grew at a rate of 1.42%
bwd–1 (% body weight per day) compared to 1.72%
bwd–1 in the summer/autumn treatment. Initial size
influenced growth rate in the summer/autumn treatment
with smaller octopuses (<0.25 g) growing faster
at 1.82% bwd–1 compared to larger octopuses at 1.68%
bwd–1. This was opposite to individuals in the spring/
summer treatment where smaller octopuses grew
slower at 1.29% bwd–1 compared to larger octopuses at
1.60% bwd–1. Initial size influenced subsequent growth,
however, this was dependent on feeding rate and appears
to be secondary to the effects of temperature.

Item Type: Article
Journal or Publication Title: Marine Biology
Publisher: Springer
Page Range: 1375- 1383
ISSN: 0025-3162
Identification Number - DOI: 10.1007/s00227-006-0575-y
Additional Information:

The original publication is available at www.springerlink.com

Date Deposited: 07 Apr 2008 14:07
Last Modified: 18 Nov 2014 03:33
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