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The Liverpool adverse events profile: Relation to AED use and mood

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Panelli, R and Kilpatrick, C and Moore, SM and Matkovic, Z and D'Souza, WJ and O'Brien, TJ (2007) The Liverpool adverse events profile: Relation to AED use and mood. Epilepsia, 48 (3). pp. 456-463. ISSN 0013-9580

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Abstract

The Liverpool Adverse Events Profile
(LAEP) is used as a systematic measure of adverse effects from
antiepileptic drugs (AEDs). This study evaluated LAEP in newly
diagnosed seizure patients, and examined the relation between
LAEP, anxiety, and depression.
Methods: Seizure patients seen in the two First Seizure Clinics
were categorized into group A (AEDs commenced after assessment),
group B (AEDs commenced before assessment), and
group C (no AEDs). LAEP and the Hospital Anxiety and Depression
Scale (HADS) were completed at baseline (n = 164)
and 3 months (n = 103). Each LAEP symptom was assessed for
baseline frequency, 3-month frequency, and frequency change
over a 3-month period. Global scores for LAEP and HADS were
analysed at baseline and 3 months.
Results: Symptom-reporting patterns were similar between
groups. However, increased frequency over a 3-month period
occurred for 12 symptoms in group A, 10 in group B, and one
in group C. Global LAEP and HADS showed no significant
group differences at baseline or changes over a 3-month period.
Multiple regression revealed that HADS scores predicted LAEP
global scores better than did AED status. Multivariate analyses
of variance demonstrated that increased reporting of 16 of 19
LAEP symptoms was significantly related to higher anxiety and
depression rates.
Conclusions: In a First Seizure Clinic, LAEP detects
changes in specific symptom frequencies when used as a
repeated, symptom-by-symptom measure. Increased symptom
frequency is associated with diagnostic category/AED
treatment, anxiety, and depression. Global LAEP scores do
not illustrate differences in symptom reporting between patients.

Item Type: Article
Keywords: Antiepileptic drugs—Adverse effects— Anxiety—Depression.
Journal or Publication Title: Epilepsia
Publisher: Wiley-Blackwell Publishing Inc
Page Range: pp. 456-463
ISSN: 0013-9580
Identification Number - DOI: 10.1111/j.1528-1167.2006.00956.x
Additional Information:

The definitive version is available at www.blackwell-synergy.com

Date Deposited: 07 Apr 2008 14:31
Last Modified: 18 Nov 2014 03:35
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