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New Tools for Determining Incidence and Severity of Mycosphaerella Leaf Disease in Eucalypt Plantations

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Pietrzykowski, E (2007) New Tools for Determining Incidence and Severity of Mycosphaerella Leaf Disease in Eucalypt Plantations. PhD thesis, University of Tasmania.

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PDF (Front Matter)
Front_Matter.pdf | Download (99kB)
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PDF (Chapters 1- 5)
Chpts1-5.pdf | Download (1MB)
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PDF (References, Appendices)
Appendix_1_Past...pdf | Download (505kB)
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PDF (Leaf to Landscape Poster)
APPS_poster3_Li...pdf | Download (244kB)
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PDF (Work Flowcharts)
Euc_plantation_...pdf | Download (218kB)
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Abstract

Plantation forests are susceptible to many pests, which can reduce the quality and
value of the wood products they source. Certain species of the fungal genus
Mycosphaerella are a concern in eucalyptus plantations around the world.
Mycosphaerella leaf disease (referred to as MLD from here in) can cause significant
leaf necrosis, discolouration and defoliation. In Australia severe outbreaks of MLD
have been observed in various eucalyptus plantations. The three aspects of MLD
research targeted in this Thesis were factors influencing its atmospheric ascospore
concentrations, the effect of its symptoms on leaf spectral properties, and the use of
remote sensing to detect MLD’s symptom distribution and severity.

Item Type: Thesis (PhD)
Date Deposited: 07 Apr 2008 16:05
Last Modified: 11 Mar 2016 05:54
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