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Organ-dependent induction of systemic resistance and systemic susceptibility in Pinus nigra inoculated with Sphaeropsis sapinea and Diplodia scrobiculata

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Blodgett, JT and Eyles, A and Bonello, P (2007) Organ-dependent induction of systemic resistance and systemic susceptibility in Pinus nigra inoculated with Sphaeropsis sapinea and Diplodia scrobiculata. Tree Physiology, 27 (4). pp. 511-517. ISSN 0829-318X

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Abstract

Systemic induced resistance (SIR) is a well-known host defense mechanism against pathogen attack in herbaceous plants, but SIR has only recently been documented in conifers. We tested if inoculation of Austrian pine
(Pinus nigra Arnold) with Sphaeropsis sapinea (Fr.:Fr.) Dyko and Sutton or Diplodia scrobiculata de Wet, Slippers and Wingfield results in SIR or systemic induced susceptibility (SIS) to subsequent colonization by S. sapinea. Induction at the stem base resulted in significant (P < 0.01) SIR in the upper stem, and induction in the upper stem resulted in significant
(P < 0.05) SIR at the stem base, indicating that SIR is
bidirectional in Austrian pine. However, inoculation at the
stem base resulted in significant (P < 0.01) SIS in shoot tips, demonstrating that, in the same host species, the expression of resistance can be organ-dependent, resulting in either SIR or SIS depending on the site of challenge infection. Systemic induced resistance in the stem was associated with induced lignification, supporting a potential role for this defense mechanism in disease resistance. Systemic induced susceptibility has been
documented before, but this is the first demonstration of organ- dependent expression of both SIR and SIS in a tree or any other plant.

Item Type: Article
Keywords: Diplodia pinea, fungal pathogen, host defense, HPLC, lignification, predisposition, secondary metabolism, SIR, SIS, systemic induced resistance, systemic induced susceptibility.
Journal or Publication Title: Tree Physiology
Page Range: pp. 511-517
ISSN: 0829-318X
Date Deposited: 05 May 2008 04:13
Last Modified: 18 Nov 2014 03:39
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