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Parental smoking and smoking experimentation in childhood increase the risk of being a smoker 20 years later: the childhood determinants of adult health study

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Paul, SL and Blizzard, CL and Patton, GC and Dwyer, T and Venn, AJ (2008) Parental smoking and smoking experimentation in childhood increase the risk of being a smoker 20 years later: the childhood determinants of adult health study. Addiction, 103 (5). pp. 846-853. ISSN 0965-2140

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Abstract

Aims: To examine the long-term effects of childhood smoking experimentation and exposure to parental smoking on
adult smoking risk.
Methods: Data were from a 20-year follow-up of 9–15-year-olds who completed questionnaires in
the 1985 Australian Schools Health and Fitness Survey (n = 6559). The relative risks (RR) of adult current smoking in
2004–05 for childhood exposure to smoking experimentation (never, a few puffs, < 10 cigarettes, >10 cigarettes) and
parental smoking (none, father, mother, both parents) in 1985, with adjustment for confounders, were estimated by
log binomial modelling. Analyses were stratified by age (9–13 and 14–15 years) and sex.
Findings: Participation at
follow-up was 54% (n = 3559). Childhood smoking experimentation increased the risk of being a current smoker
particularly for 14–15-year-old experimenters of more than 10 cigarettes [males, RR 2.72, 95% confidence interval
(CI) 1.74–4.25; females, RR 6.39, 95% CI 2.85–14.33]. Parental smoking was associated with adult current smoking
risk, particularly for 9–13-year-olds with two smoking parents (males, RR 1.53, 95% CI 1.19–1.96; females, RR 1.99,
95% CI 1.52–2.61) and older males with smoking mothers (RR 1.82, 95% CI 1.22–2.73). Parental smoking was not
associated with childhood smoking experimentation. Conclusions: These findings suggest that any childhood
smoking experimentation increases the risk of being a smoker 20 years later. As exposure to parental smoking predicted current smoking, parents should be aware of the association between their own smoking behaviour and that of
their children.

Item Type: Article
Keywords: Adolescent, child, longitudinal studies, parent, risk factor, smoking
Journal or Publication Title: Addiction
Page Range: pp. 846-853
ISSN: 0965-2140
Identification Number - DOI: 10.1111/j.1360-0443.2008.02196.x
Additional Information:

The definitive version is available at www.blackwell-synergy.com

Date Deposited: 02 Jun 2008 04:49
Last Modified: 18 Nov 2014 03:41
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