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Television viewing and abdominal obesity in young adults: is the association mediated by food and beverage consumption during viewing time or reduced leisure time physical activity?

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Cleland, VJ and Schmidt, MD and Dwyer, T and Venn, AJ (2008) Television viewing and abdominal obesity in young adults: is the association mediated by food and beverage consumption during viewing time or reduced leisure time physical activity? American Journal of Clinical Nutrition, 87 (5). pp. 1148-1155. ISSN 0002-9165

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Abstract

BACKGROUND: The behavioral pathways through which television (TV) viewing leads to increased adiposity in adults are unclear. OBJECTIVE: We wanted to determine whether the association between TV viewing and abdominal obesity in young adults is mediated by food and beverage consumption during TV viewing time or by a reduction in overall leisure-time physical activity (LTPA). DESIGN: This study involved a cross-sectional analysis of data from 2001 Australian adults aged 26-36 y. Waist circumference (WC) was measured at study clinics, and TV viewing time, frequency of food and beverage consumption during TV viewing, LTPA, and demographic characteristics were self-reported. RESULTS: Women watching TV > 3 h/d had a higher prevalence of severe abdominal obesity (WC: > or = 88 cm) compared with women watching < or = 1 h/d [prevalence ratio (PR): 1.89; 95% CI: 1.32, 2.71]. Moderate abdominal obesity (WC: 94-101.9 cm) was more prevalent in men watching TV > 3 h/d than in men watching < or = 1 h/d (PR: 2.16; 95% CI: 1.37, 3.41). Adjustment for LTPA made little difference, but adjustment for food and beverage consumption during TV viewing attenuated the associations (PR: 1.48; 95% CI: 1.01, 2.17 for women; PR: 1.73; 95% CI: 1.06, 2.83 for men). CONCLUSIONS: The association between TV viewing and WC in young adults may be partially explained by food and beverage consumption during TV viewing but was not explained by a reduction in overall LTPA. Other behaviors likely contribute to the association between TV viewing and obesity.

Item Type: Article
Journal or Publication Title: American Journal of Clinical Nutrition
Page Range: pp. 1148-1155
ISSN: 0002-9165
Date Deposited: 12 Jun 2008 22:32
Last Modified: 18 Nov 2014 03:42
URI: http://eprints.utas.edu.au/id/eprint/6657
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