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Use of temperature programming to improve resolution of inorganic anions, haloacetic acids and oxyhalides in drinking water by suppressed ion chromatography

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Barron, L and Nesterenko, PN and Paull, B (2005) Use of temperature programming to improve resolution of inorganic anions, haloacetic acids and oxyhalides in drinking water by suppressed ion chromatography. Journal of Chromatography A, 1072 (2). pp. 207-215. ISSN 0021-9673

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Abstract

Temperature programming was used to improve selectivity in the suppressed ion chromatographic (IC) separation of inorganic anions, haloacetic acids and oxyhalides in drinking water samples when using NaOH gradient elution. The programme exploited varying responses of these anions to changes in temperature. Heats of adsorption (ΔH, kJ/mol) for 17 anionic species were calculated from van’t Hoff plots. For haloacetic acids, both the degree of substitution and log P (log of n-octanol–water partition coefficient) values correlated well with the magnitude of the temperature effect, with monochloro- and monobromoacetic acids showing the largest effect (ΔH = −10.4 to −10.7 kJ/mol), dichloro- and dibromoacetic acids showing a reduced effect (ΔH = −6.8 to −8.4 kJ/mol) and trichloro-, bromodichloro- and chlorodibromoacetic acids showing the least effect (ΔH = −4.7 to −2.4 kJ/mol). The effect of temperature on oxyhalides ranged from ΔH = 8.4 kJ/mol for perchlorate to ΔH = −9.1 kJ/mol for iodate. The effectiveness of two commercial column ovens was investigated for the application of temperature gradients during chromatographic runs, with the best system applied to improve the resolution of closely retained species at the start, middle and end of the separation obtained using a previously optimised hydroxide gradient, in a real drinking water sample matrix. Retention time reproducibility of the final method ranged from 0.62 to 3.18% RSD (n = 30) showing temperature programming is indeed a practically important parameter to manipulate resolution.

Item Type: Article
Keywords: Suppressed gradient ion chromatography; Haloacetic acids; Oxyhalides; Drinking water; Temperature programming
Journal or Publication Title: Journal of Chromatography A
Page Range: pp. 207-215
ISSN: 0021-9673
Identification Number - DOI: 10.1016/j.chroma.2005.03.028
Additional Information:

The definitive version is available at http://www.sciencedirect.com

Date Deposited: 18 Sep 2008 02:53
Last Modified: 18 Nov 2014 03:50
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