Please Note:

The Open Access Repository will be moving to a new authentication system on the 1st of November.

From this date onwards, account holders will be required to login using their University of Tasmania credentials.
If your current repository username differs from your University username, please email E.Prints@utas.edu.au so we can update these details on your behalf.

Due to the change, there will be a short outage of the repository from 9am on the morning of the 1st of November

Open Access Repository

Determining the age and growth of wild octopus using stylet increment analysis

Downloads

Downloads per month over past year

Leporati, S and Semmens, JM and Pecl, GT (2008) Determining the age and growth of wild octopus using stylet increment analysis. Marine Ecology Progress Series, 367. pp. 213-222. ISSN 0171-8630

[img]
Preview
PDF
Ageing_paper.pdf | Download (426kB)

Abstract

Stylet increment analysis is a method of octopus age estimation that quantifies growth rings
within stylets (reduced internal shells found in the mantle). This method was applied to wild Octopus
pallidus to determine gender and seasonal influences on age and growth. A total of 503 individuals
(94 males and 409 females) were aged, revealing that O. pallidus can reach a maximum age of approximately
1.6 yr and that spawning occurs throughout the year. Male octopuses on average were significantly
larger (550 and 482 g for males and females, respectively) and older (259 and 243 d for males and
females, respectively) than female, and overall growth rates were positively correlated with temperature
at hatching. However, these differences were secondary to individual growth heterogeneity.
Growth of males ranged from 1.32 to 5.33% body weight (bw) d–1 and females from 1.55 to 6.9% bw d–1,
with no relationship between age and size evident regardless of sex. Stylet increment analysis is a
promising technique that could play a role similar role to statoliths in squid as an ageing tool.

Item Type: Article
Keywords: Octopus · Stylet increment analysis · Age · Growth · Seasonal effects
Journal or Publication Title: Marine Ecology Progress Series
Page Range: pp. 213-222
ISSN: 0171-8630
Identification Number - DOI: 10.3354/meps07558
Date Deposited: 23 Sep 2008 04:36
Last Modified: 18 Nov 2014 03:50
Item Statistics: View statistics for this item

Actions (login required)

Item Control Page Item Control Page
TOP