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Potential applicability of a high performance chelation ion chromatographic method to the determination of aluminium in antarctic surface seawater

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Tria, J and Haddad, PR and Nesterenko, PN (2008) Potential applicability of a high performance chelation ion chromatographic method to the determination of aluminium in antarctic surface seawater. Chemicke Listy, 102 (14). s319-s323. ISSN 0009-2770

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Abstract

In oceanography, aluminium is used as a tracer to fingerprint
the location and magnitude of atmospheric dust deposition.
Aluminium is particularly suitable as a tracer because
of its short residence time in surface seawater, its relatively
simple seawater chemistry and the fact that primary input to
the open ocean is by atmospheric deposition. The information
supplied by surface aluminium concentrations is vitally
important to understanding the role that aeolian deposition
plays in supplying trace elements to the surface ocean and
subsequent effects on biological processes. The information
is especially important for furthering knowledge of the biogeochemistry
of iron. Iron is of particular interest because
it is an essential element for the growth and metabolism of
all marine organisms despite only being available in extremely
low concentrations (0.1–0.5 nM)1. Iron has been shown
to limit phytoplankton growth, which in turn may have
implications on global climate through drawdown of gases
used in photosynthesis, such as carbon dioxide. An accurate
and robust method for determining aluminium is thus
vital for continuing studies into atmospheric deposition and
subsequently climate control.

Item Type: Article
Journal or Publication Title: Chemicke Listy
Page Range: s319-s323
ISSN: 0009-2770
Additional Information:

Copyright 2008 Association of Czech Chemical Society

Date Deposited: 18 Nov 2008 03:38
Last Modified: 18 Nov 2014 03:52
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