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A kinematic and kinetic case study of a netball shoulder pass

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Hetherington, SA and King, SG and Visentin, DC and Bird, ML (2009) A kinematic and kinetic case study of a netball shoulder pass. International Journal of Exercise Science, 2 (4). pp. 243-253. ISSN 1939-795X

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Abstract

The majority of studies analysing netball skills using force
platforms have focused on reducing the risk of injury from compression and torsion forces on the
knee and ankle joints during landing and pivoting. In this preliminary case study our aim was to
investigate the efficacy of a combination of tools to describe the kinematic and kinetic
mechanisms underlying the netball shoulder pass. The segmental movements of the netball
shoulder pass were analysed from video and force platform data in order to develop a suitable
methodology for use in a larger study. Peak vertical ground reaction force of 850 N was found to
coincide with the point of maximum velocity of the centre of pressure, occurring 40 ms before
ball release. The participant’s centre of pressure continued anteriorly for 40 ms after ball release.
The wrist traveled in a linear path during the propulsion phases, maximising impulse to the ball.
A large shear force also occurred in the anterior posterior direction coinciding with ball release
due to friction between the left shoe and the force platform, resisting the forward momentum of
the body. Negative acceleration of the upper limb following the propulsion phase reached a peak
of 68.6 rad/s-2 for the arm and 82.4 rad/s-2 for the forearm. Peak shoulder deceleration torque
was calculated at 4.1 Nm which was greater than during acceleration (1.6 Nm). The combination
of kinematic and kinetic tools yielded a comprehensive analysis of the investigated skill. Future
biomechanical studies may determine differences in skill execution between novice and
professional players or variability in movement within a population of skilled netball players.

Item Type: Article
Keywords: Biomechanics, video analysis, force platform
Journal or Publication Title: International Journal of Exercise Science
Page Range: pp. 243-253
ISSN: 1939-795X
Additional Information:

Originally published in the International Journal of Exercise Science

Date Deposited: 10 Nov 2009 22:27
Last Modified: 18 Nov 2014 04:07
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