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Freshwater fish fauna of Tasman Peninsula

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Humphries, P and White, RWG (1986) Freshwater fish fauna of Tasman Peninsula. Papers and Proceedings of the Royal Society of Tasmania, Tasman. pp. 51-58. ISSN 0080-4703

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Abstract

Of the 25 native freshwater fish species found in Tasmania, nine occur on Tasman Peninsula
along with one species of introduced fish, the brown trout Salmo trutta. The spotted galaxias
Galaxias truttaceus and the common jollytail G. mandalus were the most widespread and
abundant species found and fishes within the family Galaxiidae dominated the fauna. The life
cycles of the fish species could be classified into three types largely based on the juvenile and
adult habitats. Type 1 species, exemplified by the pouched lamprey Georria australis, breed and
the young undergo a period of development in freshwater and there is an extended period spent
at sea. Type 2 species, such as the short-finned eel Anguilla australis, breed at sea and, after a
marine juvenile stage, mature in freshwater. lype 3a species breed in estuaries, the young
spend a period of development at sea and the fish mature in freshwater. The common jollytail
is an example of this type. Type 3b species, such as the spolted galaxias, mature and breed in
freshwater and, as with Type 3a, have a marine juvenile stage. Most fish were collected in
habitats characteristically possessing abundant cover in the form of aquatic vegetation, logs or
boulders. The only introduced species, brown trout, was not widespread on the peninsula and
its effect on the native fish, although uncertain, appears minimal. Due to the necessily for all
species of native freshwater fish found on the peninsula to migrate up and down streams at
some stage of their life cycles, caution is expressed regarding any modifications to stream
habitat which may prevent this.

Item Type: Article
Keywords: Royal Society of Tasmania, RST, Van Diemens Land, natural history, science, ecology, taxonomy, botany, zoology, geology, geography, papers & proceedings, Australia, UTAS Library
Journal or Publication Title: Papers and Proceedings of the Royal Society of Tasmania
Page Range: pp. 51-58
ISSN: 0080-4703
Collections: Royal Society Collection > Papers & Proceedings of the Royal Society of Tasmania
Additional Information:

Edited by S.J. Smith. - Copyright Royal Society of Tasmania

Date Deposited: 02 Aug 2012 05:09
Last Modified: 18 Nov 2014 04:39
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