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Land routes for exploration of the western country

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Stephens, Thomas (1897) Land routes for exploration of the western country. Papers & Proceedings of the Royal Society of Tasmania. pp. 189-196.

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Abstract

As in the legendary tales of old, and the true histories of
modern times, the heroes of exploration and adventure turn
their faces to the setting sun ; so those who seek to develop
the comparatively little known mineral resources of Tasmania
are turning to the West as to a Promised Land, and the time
seems Opportune for bringing under the notice of the Royal
Society a subject in which the whole community is interested,
whether it be regarded from an economic or a scientific point
of view.
An irregular line drawn from Port Sorell in a southerly
direction, between the 146th and 147th meridians, by the
head waters of the River Mersey and the ranges west
of Lake St. Clair, and along the western slopes of the King
William Range and the Hartz Mountains to South Cape,
divides Tasmania into two portions of nearly equal area, but
unlike in all other respects. In the eastern half, except for a
fringe of settlement along the North-West Coast, are all the
agricultural and pastoral lands and chief centres of population
, in the western half, the general physical conditions
are unsuitable for farming or stock raising, and, with the
exception just noted, the population consists exclusively of
those who are engaged more or less directly in exploiting
such of its mineral wealth as has come under the prospector's
notice.

Item Type: Article
Keywords: Royal Society of Tasmania, Van Diemens Land, VDL, Hobart Town, natural sciences, proceedings, records
Journal or Publication Title: Papers & Proceedings of the Royal Society of Tasmania
Page Range: pp. 189-196
Collections: Royal Society Collection > Papers & Proceedings of the Royal Society of Tasmania
Additional Information:

In 1843 the Horticultural and Botanical Society of Van Diemen's Land was founded and became the Royal Society of Van Diemen's Land for Horticulture, Botany, and the Advancement of Science in 1844. In 1855 its name changed to Royal Society of Tasmania for Horticulture, Botany, and the Advancement of Science. In 1911 the name was shortened to Royal Society of Tasmania.

Date Deposited: 15 Feb 2013 00:16
Last Modified: 18 Nov 2014 04:48
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