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Typhoid in Hobart and Melbourne, and the influence of drainage on its prevalence

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Jamieson, James (1902) Typhoid in Hobart and Melbourne, and the influence of drainage on its prevalence. Papers & Proceedings of the Royal Society of Tasmania. pp. 95-99.

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Abstract

At the meeting of the Intercolonial Medical Congress at
Melbourne, in 1889, the subject of typhoid was largely considered,
and was adopted as the matter of discussion at one
of the general meetings. At the end of that discussion a
series of resolutions were proposed and carried unanimously.
The first affirmed : " That the prevalence of typhoid is owing
mainly to insanitary conditions, and above all to contaminated
water supply, defective drainage, and improper disposal of
night soil." By the second it was declared : " That while there
is reason to believe that the sources of the water supply of
Melbourne are carefully guarded, it is certain that, as regards
drainage and night soil disposal the arrangements are very
unsatisfactory, and to these defects must be ascribed in great
measure the excessive prevalence of typhoid fever year after
year." By the third it was affirmed: "That in the opinion of
this Congress, it is the imperative duty of the Government
to take immediate steps for bringing about an improvement
in the sanitary condition of Melbourne, and specifically for the
construction of a proper system of underground drainage,
which shall include the removal of night soil by water
carriage." James Jamieson is the Health officer for the City of Melbourne

Item Type: Article
Keywords: Royal Society of Tasmania, Van Diemens Land, VDL, Hobart Town, natural sciences, proceedings, records
Journal or Publication Title: Papers & Proceedings of the Royal Society of Tasmania
Page Range: pp. 95-99
Collections: Royal Society Collection > Papers & Proceedings of the Royal Society of Tasmania
Additional Information:

In 1843 the Horticultural and Botanical Society of Van Diemen's Land was founded and became the Royal Society of Van Diemen's Land for Horticulture, Botany, and the Advancement of Science in 1844. In 1855 its name changed to Royal Society of Tasmania for Horticulture, Botany, and the Advancement of Science. In 1911 the name was shortened to Royal Society of Tasmania.

Date Deposited: 12 Mar 2013 04:42
Last Modified: 18 Nov 2014 04:49
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