Open Access Repository

Observations regarding the recent discovery by G. Thureau, F.G.S., of a fossil reptile in the Mersey coal measures at Railton

Downloads

Downloads per month over past year

Johnston, Robert Mackenzie (1900) Observations regarding the recent discovery by G. Thureau, F.G.S., of a fossil reptile in the Mersey coal measures at Railton. Papers & Proceedings of the Royal Society of Tasmania. pp. 9-11.

[img]
Preview
PDF
Johnston-discov...pdf | Download (462kB)
Available under University of Tasmania Standard License.

Abstract

Mr. Gr. Thureau, formerly Oovernment Geologist
of Tasmania, has kindly submitted a carefully
prepared cast of the remains of a fossil reptile discovered
by him in the spoil-heap from a (then) new main shaft sunk
by a Sydney company near Railton, in the Mersey Coal
Measures, and, therefore, of Upper Permo-Carboniferous
age.
Opinion has it that it is within the group of the Labyrinthodontia, embraced within the Sub-order, resemble Lizards in outward appearance and have the centra of
the vertebras more or less elongated, and long curved ribs.
One genus of this order, Lininerpeton, of the Permian
of Bohemia, possesses characteristics of the vertebrae of
the central and caudal parts, which come very close to
our Tasmanian representation from the Permo-Carboniferous
Coal Measure of Railton, Tasmania.
For the sake of reference, and as a compliment to
Mr. Thureau, I propose in the meantime to refer always
to this, the oldest known remains of a vertebrate in
Tasmanian rocks, as "Thureau s Microsaiirian".

Item Type: Article
Keywords: Royal Society of Tasmania, Van Diemens Land, VDL, Hobart Town, natural sciences, proceedings, records
Journal or Publication Title: Papers & Proceedings of the Royal Society of Tasmania
Page Range: pp. 9-11
Collections: Royal Society Collection
Royal Society Collection > Papers & Proceedings of the Royal Society of Tasmania
Additional Information:

In 1843 the Horticultural and Botanical Society of Van Diemen's Land was founded and became the Royal Society of Van Diemen's Land for Horticulture, Botany, and the Advancement of Science in 1844. In 1855 its name changed to Royal Society of Tasmania for Horticulture, Botany, and the Advancement of Science. In 1911 the name was shortened to Royal Society of Tasmania.

Date Deposited: 15 Apr 2013 01:20
Last Modified: 15 Sep 2017 01:07
Item Statistics: View statistics for this item

Actions (login required)

Item Control Page Item Control Page
TOP