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A latitudinal cline in disease resistance of a host tree

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Hamilton, MG and Williams, DR and Tilyard, P and Pinkard, EA and Wardlaw, T and Glen, M and Vaillancourt, RE and Potts, BM (2013) A latitudinal cline in disease resistance of a host tree. Heredity, 110. pp. 372-379.

[img] PDF (Hamilton M, Williams D, Tilyard P, Pinkard E, Wardlaw T, Glen M, Vaillancourt R, Potts B (2013) A latitudinal cline in disease resistance of a host tree. Heredity 110, 372-379.)
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Abstract

The possible drivers and implications of an observed latitudinal cline in disease resistance of a host tree were examined. Mycosphaerella leaf disease (MLD) damage, caused by Teratosphaeria species, was assessed in five Eucalyptus globulus (Tasmanian blue gum) common garden trials containing open-pollinated progeny from 13 native-forest populations. Significant population and family within population variation in MLD resistance was detected, which was relatively stable across different combinations of trial sites, ages, seasons and epidemics. A distinct genetic-based latitudinal cline in MLD damage among host populations was evident. Two lines of evidence argue that the observed genetic-based latitudinal trend was the result of direct pathogen-imposed selection for MLD resistance. First, MLD damage was positively associated with temperature and negatively associated with a prediction of disease risk in the native environment of these populations; and, second, the quantitative inbreeding coefficient (QST) significantly exceeded neutral marker FST at the trial that exhibited the greatest MLD damage, suggesting that diversifying selection contributed to differentiation in MLD resistance among populations. This study highlights the potential for spatial variation in pathogen risk to drive adaptive differentiation across the geographic range of a foundation host tree species.

Item Type: Article
Keywords: Teratosphaeria; Eucalyptus globulus (Tasmanian blue gum); pathogen-imposed selection; disease risk; latitudinal cline; genetic variation
Journal or Publication Title: Heredity
Page Range: pp. 372-379
Identification Number - DOI: 10.1038/hdy.2012.106
Additional Information:

Copyright 2013 Macmillan

Date Deposited: 26 Mar 2013 05:20
Last Modified: 18 Nov 2014 04:50
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