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On Dr. Noetling's conclusions respecting the aboriginal designations for stone implements.

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Ritz, Hermann B (1908) On Dr. Noetling's conclusions respecting the aboriginal designations for stone implements. Papers and Proceedings of the Royal Society of Tasmania. pp. 68-72. ISSN 0080-4703

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Abstract

Dr. Noetling's conclusions are that:
(a) There were two classes of stone utensils—one consisting
of round, water-worn stones, called
pe-ura, and used for religious ceremonies; the
other of chipped, sharpened stones, called by
various names, and used for cutting;
(b) The Aborigines had perhaps two words, but
probably only one, for siliceous implements;
(c) The Aborigines did not manufacture special
implements for special purposes.
The arguments he adduces from the aboriginal
vocabulary are so cogent that his conclusions are almost
inevitable. It seems to me that only some of the details
are arguable, and I shall confine myself to these.
I would finally mention that I have heard that
there exist some phonographic records of the actual
aboriginal speech; if these could be found, they would
be of the greatest value. As far as I am able to advance
the study of that speech I shall do my utmost, and feel
confident that the Royal Society will encourage my
efforts.

Item Type: Article
Keywords: Royal Society of Tasmania, Van Diemens Land, VDL, Hobart Town, natural sciences, proceedings, records
Journal or Publication Title: Papers and Proceedings of the Royal Society of Tasmania
Page Range: pp. 68-72
ISSN: 0080-4703
Collections: Royal Society Collection > Papers & Proceedings of the Royal Society of Tasmania
Additional Information:

In 1843 the Horticultural and Botanical Society of Van Diemen's Land was founded and became the Royal Society of Van Diemen's Land for Horticulture, Botany, and the Advancement of Science in 1844. In 1855 its name changed to Royal Society of Tasmania for Horticulture, Botany, and the Advancement of Science. In 1911 the name was shortened to Royal Society of Tasmania.

Date Deposited: 08 May 2013 06:31
Last Modified: 15 Sep 2017 01:07
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