Open Access Repository

Geological notes on the country traversed by the Derwent Valley railway extension. (incl.plate xiii.).

Downloads

Downloads per month over past year

Stephens, Thomas (1909) Geological notes on the country traversed by the Derwent Valley railway extension. (incl.plate xiii.). Papers and Proceedings of the Royal Society of Tasmania. pp. 170-174. ISSN 0080-4703

[img]
Preview
PDF
1909-Stephens-g...pdf | Download (531kB)
Available under University of Tasmania Standard License.

Abstract

The great basaltic sheet, once continuous from Macquarie
Plains to Glenora, ends somewhat abruptly on
the Northern slope of the valley of the River Styx.
Whether it originally extended farther is uncertain, but
the probability is that its advance was barred by thick bedded
tertiary sands and clays corresponding to those
exposed in the bed of the Derwent near Macquarie
Plains, and covered in pre-basaltic times by a great accumulation
of drift gravels, the greater part of the whole
formation being subsequently removed by denudation.
Half a mile from the Glenora station the new line passes
through solid basalt, the continuity of which is broken
by an irregular band, the determination of the character
of which will require a more careful examination than
is practicable on a flying visit. It is loosely compacted,
and some of it has the appearance of volcanic tuff. But
the interesting feature is that, scattered through the
formation are crystalline patches of opal varying in
colour from pure white to dark brown. There are also
faint but unmistakable traces of fossil wood.

Item Type: Article
Keywords: Royal Society of Tasmania, Van Diemens Land, VDL, Hobart Town, natural sciences, proceedings, records
Journal or Publication Title: Papers and Proceedings of the Royal Society of Tasmania
Page Range: pp. 170-174
ISSN: 0080-4703
Collections: Royal Society Collection > Papers & Proceedings of the Royal Society of Tasmania
Additional Information:

In 1843 the Horticultural and Botanical Society of Van Diemen's Land was founded and became the Royal Society of Van Diemen's Land for Horticulture, Botany, and the Advancement of Science in 1844. In 1855 its name changed to Royal Society of Tasmania for Horticulture, Botany, and the Advancement of Science. In 1911 the name was shortened to Royal Society of Tasmania.

Date Deposited: 13 May 2013 02:40
Last Modified: 15 Sep 2017 01:07
Item Statistics: View statistics for this item

Actions (login required)

Item Control Page Item Control Page
TOP