Open Access Repository

The antiquity of man in Tasmania.

Downloads

Downloads per month over past year

Noetling, Fritz (1910) The antiquity of man in Tasmania. Papers and Proceedings of the Royal Society of Tasmania. pp. 231-261. ISSN 0080-4703

[img]
Preview
PDF
1910-Noetling-a...pdf | Download (2MB)
Available under University of Tasmania Standard License.

Abstract

I. Introductory Remarks:.
There exists in Tasmania perhaps the greatest unconformity
in the history of evolution of the human
race that we know of. Modern civilisation follows immediately
on the most typical archaeolithic stage that
is known to us. All intermediate stages which we
observe in other countries are missing in that island.
From this point of view it was fortunate that the contact
between the lower and the higher civilised race lasted
for such a short time only. Not thirty years lapsed between
the first encounter at Risdon ferry and the final
deportation of the Aborigines to Flinders Island. This
time was not long enough to adulterate the archaeolithic
civilisation by the introduction of foreign ideas.
However deplorable it may be that the Aborigines died out so
rapidly, there is at least one consolation in their fate —their civilisation has been delivered to us in all its
characteristic features. But we have to thank another
lucky accident for this, viz., the insular seclusion of Tasmania

Item Type: Article
Keywords: Royal Society of Tasmania, Van Diemens Land, VDL, Hobart Town, natural sciences, proceedings, records
Journal or Publication Title: Papers and Proceedings of the Royal Society of Tasmania
Page Range: pp. 231-261
ISSN: 0080-4703
Collections: Royal Society Collection > Papers & Proceedings of the Royal Society of Tasmania
Additional Information:

In 1843 the Horticultural and Botanical Society of Van Diemen's Land was founded and became the Royal Society of Van Diemen's Land for Horticulture, Botany, and the Advancement of Science in 1844. In 1855 its name changed to Royal Society of Tasmania for Horticulture, Botany, and the Advancement of Science. In 1911 the name was shortened to Royal Society of Tasmania.

Date Deposited: 22 May 2013 04:53
Last Modified: 15 Sep 2017 01:07
Item Statistics: View statistics for this item

Actions (login required)

Item Control Page Item Control Page
TOP