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Comparison of the Tasmanian tronatta with the archaeolithic implements of Europe.

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Noetling, Fritz (1910) Comparison of the Tasmanian tronatta with the archaeolithic implements of Europe. Papers and Proceedings of the Royal Society of Tasmania. pp. 265-282. ISSN 0080-4703

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Abstract

Before we compare the Tasmanian tronatta with the
similar implements from Europe, it will be useful to fix
the main features of the Tasmanian civilisation, because
it represents the purest type of archaeolithic civilisation.
We may deplore the fact that the Tasmanians died out
within a few years since they came in contact with the
Europeans; yet even this had its advantages. There was
no time for the inception of ideas foreign to the Tasmanian
mind; the primitive state of civilisation could not
be adulterated by other notions. This preservation of the
archaeolithic stage in all its pureness would have been
impossible if the Tasmanians had become more or less
acquainted with foreign ideas. We would always have
to consider the probable influence of extraneous notions
had this been the case. The Aborigines had already made at least one important
invention, based on a certain amount of logical
reasoning. Instead of using any pebble or rock in its
natural state, they had learned that certain siliceous rocks
could be split, and that the flakes, by means of their
sharp edges, were more suitable implements than those
provided by nature—for instance, sharp-edged pieces
of columnar diabas.
The tronattas were tools only, and they were never
used as weapons. The Tasmanian civilisation had not
made the invention to provide the spears with stone heads
or to fix a handle to some of the large tronattas.

Item Type: Article
Keywords: Royal Society of Tasmania, Van Diemens Land, VDL, Hobart Town, natural sciences, proceedings, records
Journal or Publication Title: Papers and Proceedings of the Royal Society of Tasmania
Page Range: pp. 265-282
ISSN: 0080-4703
Collections: Royal Society Collection > Papers & Proceedings of the Royal Society of Tasmania
Additional Information:

In 1843 the Horticultural and Botanical Society of Van Diemen's Land was founded and became the Royal Society of Van Diemen's Land for Horticulture, Botany, and the Advancement of Science in 1844. In 1855 its name changed to Royal Society of Tasmania for Horticulture, Botany, and the Advancement of Science. In 1911 the name was shortened to Royal Society of Tasmania.

Date Deposited: 22 May 2013 04:43
Last Modified: 15 Sep 2017 01:07
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