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What science and commerce may gain from an Antarctic expedition

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Morton, Alexander (1890) What science and commerce may gain from an Antarctic expedition. Papers and Proceedings of the Royal Society of Tasmania. pp. 260-262. ISSN 0080-4703

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Abstract

What is to be gained from an Antarctic Expedition is a
question so frequently asked that some notice should be
taken of it, and an answer framed that, if possible, shall be
satisfactory.
Perhaps a reference to what has been done by Arctic
Exploration may encourage belief that some benefit would
accrue from a properly equipped expedition to the Antarctic
region.
Observations in the far north have been of incalculable
value for the confirmation or correction of scientific
theories relating to ocean currents, magnetic deviations,
climatology, geographical distribution of plants and animals,
and a host of similar subjects; while, as to commerce, it is
only necessary to mention the discovery of the White Sea
route to Russia, with its consequent trade, the establishment
of the Spitzbergen fisheries, and the opening up of new and
lucrative whaling grounds in Baffin's Bay and Prince
Regent's Inlet, as convincing proofs of the usefulness of
many expeditions that promised less in the way of discovery
than one to the Antarctic regions.
An Antarctic expedition is thought to be of vital importance but should not be left to any other country other than England and her loyal Australasian subjects.

Item Type: Article
Keywords: Royal Society of Tasmania, Van Diemens Land, VDL, Hobart Town, natural sciences, proceedings, records
Journal or Publication Title: Papers and Proceedings of the Royal Society of Tasmania
Page Range: pp. 260-262
ISSN: 0080-4703
Collections: Royal Society Collection > Papers & Proceedings of the Royal Society of Tasmania
Additional Information:

In 1843 the Horticultural and Botanical Society of Van Diemen's Land was founded and became the Royal Society of Van Diemen's Land for Horticulture, Botany, and the Advancement of Science in 1844. In 1855 its name changed to Royal Society of Tasmania for Horticulture, Botany, and the Advancement of Science. In 1911 the name was shortened to Royal Society of Tasmania.

Date Deposited: 02 Jul 2013 02:49
Last Modified: 15 Sep 2017 01:07
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