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Characteristics and influence of the Australian conservation movement: An examination of selected conservation controversies

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Davis, BW (1981) Characteristics and influence of the Australian conservation movement: An examination of selected conservation controversies. PhD thesis, University of Tasmania.

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Abstract

This thesis is a study of selected aspects of Australian
environmentalism during the period 1960-1980. By analysing a number
of case-studies of environmental conflict, the aim is to discover some
characteristics of the Australian conservation movement and to determine
what influence, if any, eco-activists have exerted on the reform of
resource management practices of public authorities and private corporations.
Environmentalism is here defined as a social and political movement
involving specific sets of beliefs about the relationship of man and Nature,
generally antipathetical to existing modes of technology and natural
resources utilisation.
The opening three chapters of the thesis are devoted to an examination
of various types of environmentalism and their outward manifestation as
political action by voluntary conservation groups. It is argued that
community environmental organisations face a number of internal stresses
arising from variations in values and ideology, the loose affiliation of
members, reliance upon voluntary effort, diverse organisational structures
and leadership styles, as well as lack of financial resources. Yet high
motivation, cadres of dedicated activists and unorthodox tactics, create
strong survival capacity. In order to achieve political influence through
lobbying, persuasion, bargaining and coercion, such groups must penetrate
key decision processes, yet conform to the norms of the socio-political
culture, or else achieve a weight of public opinion favourable to their
cause.

Item Type: Thesis (PhD)
Additional Information:

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Date Deposited: 03 Jun 2014 00:18
Last Modified: 15 Sep 2017 01:06
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