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Physico-chemical characterisation of surface defects on chemically protective gloves used in agriculture

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Canning, KM (1997) Physico-chemical characterisation of surface defects on chemically protective gloves used in agriculture. PhD thesis, University of Tasmania.

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Abstract

Australian agriculture is largely dependent on the use of pesticides. Many pesticides
have detrimental effects on human health, and consequently occupational exposure
presents a serious problem. Pesticide application can be dangerous work and farmers
rely on chemical protective clothing to provide a bather to dermal exposure. Hands
are one of the most often contaminated anatomical sites and therefore gloves are
perhaps the most important item of protective apparel.
The principal objective of this thesis is to ascertain the types of chemically protective
gloves that are used in agriculture, and to determine if these gloves are suitable for
effective protection against chemical exposure to farmers. The hypothesis that evolved
from this objective is:
That, due to poor quality control, no protocols in glove care and patchy
promotion of their usage, I predict that chemically protective gloves are
inadequate for farmers' needs.
The aims that have evolved from the hypothesis are:
1. to find out what types of protective gloves are being worn by farmers during
pesticide application, and to determine the condition, age and maintenance regime of
these gloves;
2. to identify and classify the microscopic physical surface defects that occur in new
and used gloves and those exposed to simulated field conditions and to compare them
statistically;
3. to compare the surface chemical composition of new gloves, used gloves and those
subjected to simulated field exposure;
4. to determine if gloves used by farmers are suitable for use in the outdoor
environment; and
5. to describe the progress of degradation in gloves exposed to the outdoors to
determine their suitability for use outdoors and their life expectancy.
The sampling area was restricted to Tasmania, and although this state is not completely
representative of the whole of Australian agriculture, it nevertheless encompasses a
wide variety of agricultural production.

Item Type: Thesis (PhD)
Copyright Holders: The Author
Copyright Information:

Copyright 1997 the Author - The University is continuing to endeavour to trace the copyright
owner(s) and in the meantime this item has been reproduced here in good faith. We
would be pleased to hear from the copyright owner(s).

Additional Information:

A new for old exchange program was undertaken to ascertain what types of gloves farmers wear when applying pesticides. Gloves of polyvinyl chloride, nitrile-butadiene rubber, natural rubber, leather, leather/cotton, combinations of PVC and NBR, and unidentified material were collected. New PVC and NBR gloves were tested by simulating aspects of field conditions in the laboratory. Thesis (Ph.D.)--University of Tasmania, 1998. Includes bibliographical references. A new for old exchange program was undertaken to ascertain what types of gloves farmers wear when applying pesticides. Gloves of polyvinyl chloride, nitrile-butadiene rubber, natural rubber, leather, leather/cotton, combinations of PVC and NBR, and unidentified material were collected. New PVC and NBR gloves were tested by simulating aspects of field conditions in the laboratory

Date Deposited: 25 Nov 2014 00:48
Last Modified: 11 Mar 2016 05:55
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