Open Access Repository

Imaginary companions : their role in childhood development

Downloads

Downloads per month over past year

Bouldin, Paula M (1998) Imaginary companions : their role in childhood development. PhD thesis, University of Tasmania.

[img]
Preview
PDF (Whole thesis)
whole_BouldinPa...pdf | Download (10MB)
Available under University of Tasmania Standard License.

| Preview

Abstract

Five studies were conducted to investigate the emotional and cognitive factors
associated with the presence of imaginary companions in children aged 3 to 9 years. In
Study 1 parents were asked to complete a questionnaire which sought information
regarding the characteristics of children with and without imaginary companions.
Overall, a significantly larger number of children with imaginary companions were
reported to be very imaginative and to have an increased predisposition to fantasy
compared to children without companions.
Study two investigated the fearfulness, anxiety, and temperament characteristics
of imaginary companion and non-imaginary companion children. Examination of
maternal ratings on the Fear Survey Schedule for Children-H Parent (FSSC-BP), the
Revised Children's Manifest Anxiety Scale (RCMAS), and the Short Temperament
Scale for Children (STSC), found that a significantly larger number of imaginary
companion than non-imaginary companion children were reported to experience
internalised anxiety associated with sensitivity to the environment and the expectations
of others.
Study 3 further examined the predisposition to fantasy of imaginary companion
and non-imaginary companion children by asking them a series of questions regarding
their dreams, daydreams, and scary thoughts. Analysis of children's taped responses
indicated that a significantly larger number of imaginary companion than non-imaginary
companion children experienced vivid mental imagery that incorporated a fantasy
element.

Item Type: Thesis (PhD)
Keywords: Imaginary companions
Copyright Holders: The Author
Copyright Information:

Copyright 1998 the Author - The University is continuing to endeavour to trace the copyright
owner(s) and in the meantime this item has been reproduced here in good faith. We
would be pleased to hear from the copyright owner(s).

Additional Information:

Thesis (Ph.D.)--University of Tasmania, 1998. Includes bibliographical references

Date Deposited: 25 Nov 2014 00:48
Last Modified: 21 Jun 2016 00:10
Item Statistics: View statistics for this item

Actions (login required)

Item Control Page Item Control Page
TOP