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Investigation into the relationship between computer self-efficacy, anxiety, experience, support and usuage

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Boonyong, Janporn (2004) Investigation into the relationship between computer self-efficacy, anxiety, experience, support and usuage. Coursework Master thesis, University of Tasmania.

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Abstract

Understanding an individual's use of information technology has become an
important determinant of successful usage and implementation of technology. In order
to help understand and improve the successful use of information technology this
research aim to investigate some key factors that influence an individual's use of
information technology and the relationship between those factors. This research
examines the relationship between computer self-efficacy, computer anxiety,
computer experience, organisational/Faculty support, and computer usage. A
conceptual model posits that computer usage is influenced by several factors such as
computer self-efficacy, computer anxiety, computer experience and
organisational/Faculty support. Based on the responses of 137 Commerce students at
University of Tasmania, we found that computer experience and Faculty support had
a positive relationship with computer self-efficacy. While computer self-efficacy,
computer experience and Faculty support had negative relationship with computer
anxiety. However, Faculty support and computer experience were found to have no
significant relationship with computer usage. The findings are important as they
provide information on how faculties might consider assisting students in their
utilising technology.

Item Type: Thesis (Coursework Master)
Keywords: Computer literacy, Anxiety, Self-efficacy
Copyright Holders: The Author
Copyright Information:

Copyright 2004 the Author - The University is continuing to endeavour to trace the copyright
owner(s) and in the meantime this item has been reproduced here in good faith. We
would be pleased to hear from the copyright owner(s).

Additional Information:

Thesis (MIS)--University of Tasmania, 2004. Includes bibliographical references (leaves 88-102)

Date Deposited: 25 Nov 2014 00:53
Last Modified: 20 Jun 2016 23:01
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