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The development of the concept of individuality and its application in educational psychology

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Bolger, A. W. (Anthony William) (1965) The development of the concept of individuality and its application in educational psychology. Unspecified thesis, University of Tasmania.

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Abstract

The concept of individuality emerged in a rudimentary
form in pre-historic times but it was not until
Ancient Greece that it was generally recognized. By Roman
times the Idea of individual differences in learning
capacity was understood and Quintilian suggested methods
by which education could be adapted to those differences.
The value placed upon the individual soul by Christianity
gave added depth to the concept but the practical
application of it dwindled during the Middle Ages. With
the Renaissance, the re-discovery of the Ancients, particularly
Quintilian, created a new awareness of man's individual
worth and this stimulated both new enquiry into the meaning
and nature of individuality and a new spirit in education.
From this time on, the optimum development of the individual
became an important aim of education and the understanding
of the nature of the individual, a prime purpose in
psychology. In educational reformers such as Froebel and
Montessori and in psychologists such as Herbart and Galton,
these two influences began to come together. The early
days of the Twentieth Century saw a general preoccupation
with the psychology of individual differences and its
application to education. The introduction of general education,
however, created new problems. At the present day, the basic question of how to reconcile the needs of the
individual to large scale education has still not been
answered. Taking Tasmania as an example, it is demonstrated
that the realization of the need for individualized education
on the one hand and its implication in the classroom on the
other, do not coincide. Some recent publications have
indicated just how urgently society needs such a system of
education, while others have suggested that, with new
methods and new materials, an individualized system of
education is entirely practicable.

Item Type: Thesis (Unspecified)
Copyright Holders: The Author
Copyright Information:

Copyright 1965 the Author - The University is continuing to endeavour to trace the copyright owner(s) and in the meantime this item has been reproduced here in good faith. We would be pleased to hear from the copyright owner(s).

Additional Information:

Thesis (M.A.) - University of Tasmania, 1965

Date Deposited: 25 Nov 2014 00:59
Last Modified: 04 May 2016 00:58
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