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The First G P Term : a curriculum for the first three months which the intending practitioner spends in general practice

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Carpenter, Hugh (1988) The First G P Term : a curriculum for the first three months which the intending practitioner spends in general practice. Coursework Master thesis, University of Tasmania.

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Abstract

"THE FIRST G P TERM", a curriculum for the first three
months which the intending practitioner spends in general
practice, addresses three questions: why is there a need
for such a curriculum; how should it be constituted, and
how should it be presented?
The need for this curriculum is explored in terms of the
background education with which medical graduates approach
general practice. Medical science learned in Universities
and Teaching Hospitals requires adaptation and additional
competencies have to be acquired if the doctor is to become
a general practitioner. In this process, the first three
months in general practice is critical. Patterns of
effective practice need to be established at the outset,
patterns which will last a lifetime with continuing refinement.
Among the comparatively modest literature about
education for general practice, I have been unable to find
a comprehensive curriculum for this significant transition
from hospital to domiciliary practice, the first G P term. The body of the curriculum addresses the other two
questions; how and what to learn? Throughout, I have
drawn on my own experience of over twenty years in general
practice education as scholar, tutor, and administrator.
Three considerations are common to the whole dissertation:
what is the present state of affairs; what alternatives are
feasible; and why do I prefer my particular choice?
The curriculum is presented in nine sections. These are:
the 'school' of Teaching Practices;
Scholars and their scholarship;
Tutors and teaching;
Management and co-ordination of the curriculum;
the syllabus; evaluation of expectations, progress and outcomes;
continuing medical education;
an overview of these components;
a summary of recommendations.
In each of the first seven sections as listed here, a
pattern is followed; namely, what selection is made (of
Teaching Practices, Scholars, Tutors, Managers, syllabus,
methods of evaluation and continuing education), on what
basis, and how might this be improved; what expectations
are involved and to what extent are these met ?
Consideration of the most cost-effective alternative is a
recurring theme. Ways of learning, particularly the implementation of selfdirected
contract learning, are central to the dissertation.
The selection of the most appropriate syllabus is studied,
to facilitate the transition from hospital to general
practice, avoiding the already known and the irrelevant.
Evaluation is built in to every aspect of the curriculum,
along the lines of illuminative evaluation (Parlett &
1 Hamilton, 1972) .
The central features of the curriculum, together with
recommendations for change, are drawn together in
conclusion. Appended to the dissertation are documents in
current use during the first G P term.

Item Type: Thesis (Coursework Master)
Copyright Holders: The Author
Copyright Information:

Copyright 1988 the Author. Copyright the Author - The University is continuing to endeavour to trace the copyright
owner(s) and in the meantime this item has been reproduced here in good faith. We
would be pleased to hear from the copyright owner(s).

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A curriculum for the first three months which the intending practitioner spends in general practice

Date Deposited: 25 Nov 2014 01:00
Last Modified: 11 Mar 2016 05:55
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