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The Aegean and the East : an investigation into the exchange of artistic motifs between the Aegean, Egypt, and the Near East in the Bronze Age

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Crowley, Janice L (1977) The Aegean and the East : an investigation into the exchange of artistic motifs between the Aegean, Egypt, and the Near East in the Bronze Age. PhD thesis, University of Tasmania.

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Abstract

The aim of this thesis is to investigate the artistic
phenomenon that, in the Bronze Age, many motifs were used in common
by the arts of the Aegean, Egypt, and the Near East, in order to come
to a conclusion as to whether this common usage can be attributed to
indigenous creation in each separate area or whether it is due to
crossfertilisation of the artistic traditions.
The thesis is presented in two volumes, VOLUME I TEXT and
VOLUME II PLATES. The text volume contains a list of abbreviations,
the text arranged in four sections, Introduction, Part I The Motifs,
Pant II The Artistic Issues, and Conclusion, a bibliography and
chronological table. The plate volume contains the plates and plate
list, a concordance of sites and plates, a concordance of motifs in
Aegean glyptic, and a set of maps. The plate volume is considered
integral to the thesis as being the true record of the primary source
material.
In VOLUME I TEXT the Intnoduction states the aim of the
thesis, outlines the chronological stand taken, defines the principal
artistic terms used, and defends the methodology of iconographical
analysis.
Part I The Motifs discusses over fifty motifs covering a
wide variety of subjects, heraldic and religious symbols, floral and
linear designs, the human figure, and general themes like war and the
hunt. With the help of a precise terminology these motifs are studied
individually having regard to their early traditions, their subsequent
modifications, and to the variations acceptable in different areas.

Part II The Artistic Issues opens with a discussion of the
problems that arise from the above detailed survey of motifs, the most
important one being the question of possible transference of motifs
from one artistic tradition to another. On the basis of the
correspondence of iconographical detail it is argued that twelve motifs
transfer from the eastern traditions to Aegean art and that two motifs
transfer from the Aegean to the East. The iconography also suggests
the likelihood of the transference of smaller motifs and artistic
details out of large scale compositions. The result of these
transferences is the establishment in the Late Bronze Age of an
International Repertoire of motifs drawn upon by the artists of many
lands, Aegean and eastern. Part II goes on to assess the extent to
which the foreign motif is assimilated into the indigenous tradition.
Two levels of penetration are distinguished, an initial level, the
Intrusive Element, and a deeper level, the Incorporated Element, where
the exotic motif is assimilated into the local style. Part II further
argues that some pieces fall into a special category for which the
recently coined phrase International Style is accepted, and after
classifying some special examples, it examines the means by which the
motif transferences may have been effected. Part II concludes with a
discussion on the acceptance or rejection of particular motifs by
Minoan and Mycenaean art.
The Conclusion provides a summary of the results of this
investigation of artistic motifs, and assesses the contribution of
this thesis to scholarship in the fields of ancient art and art history.

Item Type: Thesis (PhD)
Keywords: Exoticism in art, Art, Ancient, Art, Aegean
Copyright Holders: The Author
Copyright Information:

Copyright 1977 the Author - The University is continuing to endeavour to trace the copyright
owner(s) and in the meantime this item has been reproduced here in good faith. We
would be pleased to hear from the copyright owner(s).

Additional Information:

Thesis (Ph.D.)--University of Tasmania, 1980. Bibliography: l. 271-292 (v. 1)

Date Deposited: 08 Dec 2014 23:54
Last Modified: 11 Mar 2016 05:56
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