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Manufacturing linkages in Launceston : a study of a peripherally located provincial service centre and the implications for linkage development in capitalist economies

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Hanson, PH (1985) Manufacturing linkages in Launceston : a study of a peripherally located provincial service centre and the implications for linkage development in capitalist economies. PhD thesis, University of Tasmania.

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Abstract

The primary research objectives of this study are to:
(i) determine the character of manufacturing operations in
Launceston, a provincial service centre in a peripherally
located environment;
(ii) determine the local and interregional linkage patterns of
Launceston's manufacturing operations;
(iii) determine the factors responsible for variations in the
linkage behaviour of Launceston's manufacturers; and
(iv) compare Launceston linkage structures with those established
for other urban and regional environments within a framework
of spatial variation in linkage development among capitalist
economies, focusing particularly on the macroeconomic
environment as it relates to regional variations in
urban/industrial structure in determining linkage patterns.
The study accomplishes these objectives via a comprehensive survey of
all Launceston manufacturing operations, regardless of size and type of
manufacturing activity. Indeed, the census approach adopted, the range of
data collected, and the wide (yet appropriate to contemporary industrial
geography) definitional interpretations used, permit the evolution of a
broadly based study within a specific environmental context that expands
the spatial perspectives of linkage behaviour. Moreover, the methodologies
present a format for further study which will readily facilitate
interregional comparison.
Manufacturing in Launceston is found to be dominated by small scale,
industrially diverse, service oriented activities, with most large scale
operations restricted to resource based activity, supplemented by limited
fabricative activity that has ''filtered down'' from core area economies.
Forward linkages of the Launceston manufacturing economy are highly
localised, which is largely a function of the nature and location of demand,
and the character of the local economy. Limited local intermediate demand
results in a component of long distance forward linkages. Backward
linkages, however, are considerably more spatially extended because of
limited local potential for backward integration. This potential exists
through the natural resources of the area, although most firms are
dependent on commodities that are not produced locally. In the latter
circumstance, differentials in firm character are strongly associated with
differences in the mechanism of acquisition.
These patterns are found to be entirely consistent with Launceston's
peripheral and provincial service centre status. The study concludes that
regional variations in linkage capacity determine the parameters for linkage
development, to which firms respond with varying strategies. A partial
equilibrium model of linkage structure development, in which the potential
for local orientation varies according to core-periphery/urban hierarchy
relationships, is proposed. The integration of macroeconomic and
organisational relationships within a spatial framework contributes an
important dimension to contemporary debate concerning firm behaviour and
environmental interactions.

Item Type: Thesis (PhD)
Keywords: Marketing
Copyright Holders: The Author
Copyright Information:

Copyright 1985 the Author - The University is continuing to endeavour to trace the copyright
owner(s) and in the meantime this item has been reproduced here in good faith. We
would be pleased to hear from the copyright owner(s).

Additional Information:

Thesis (Ph.D.)--University of Tasmania, 1986

Date Deposited: 08 Dec 2014 23:57
Last Modified: 23 May 2017 01:31
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