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The lived experience of married women who place their husbands into a nursing home

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Hills, T (1995) The lived experience of married women who place their husbands into a nursing home. Coursework Master thesis, University of Tasmania.

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Abstract

The purpose of this study is to deepen understandings of the experience of
married women who place their husbands into a nursing home. Interpretive
research investigates our lived experience and addresses questions of being. A
phenomenological study allows the particular and the unique meanings to be
disclosed. Meaning and significance of placing one's husband into a nursing
home remains hidden in much of the literature as a consequence of theoretical
constructs entrenched within the positivist paradigm. The purpose of this study
for nurses is found in bringing to the nursing discourse another perspective on this
phenomenon. The insights gained from this study may radicalise thought and
inform nursing practice.
Conversation was chosen in anticipation of narrowing the gap between the
researcher and the researched. These women's stories were descriptively written
using their words. The philosophical thought of Heidegger helped guide the
methodology and generate the understandings of the study. Through reflection on
the conversations, understandings emerged. Three themes: connectedness; living
out the tensions and re-discovery of self formed the thematic statement which
describes the everyday experience of these three women.
The lived experience of married women who place their husbands into a nursing
home is expressed through a constant working towards maintaining a meaningful
connection with their husband, whilst finding a new way of being as they live out
the tensions associated with that placement.

Item Type: Thesis (Coursework Master)
Keywords: Older people, Older people
Copyright Holders: The Author
Copyright Information:

Copyright 1995 the Author - The University is continuing to endeavour to trace the copyright owner(s) and in the meantime this item has been reproduced here in good faith. We would be pleased to hear from the copyright owner(s).

Additional Information:

Thesis (M.N.)--University of Tasmania, 1996. Includes bibliographical references

Date Deposited: 19 Dec 2014 02:35
Last Modified: 11 Apr 2017 01:20
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